1970's Cedar Beams

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  #1  
Old 12-05-06, 08:17 PM
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1970's Cedar Beams

My vaulted ceiling has a main beam down the middle 4"x12"x15' and and 2 beams 4"x6"x13' on each side going up the vault. All beams are exposed obviously. The ceiling is framed on one side with the 2x6 roof rafters and the other side has 2x6's nailed to those rafters centered over that main beam. I'm 99.9% sure that the beams are entirely cosmetic but are there any tell tale signs that in fact that is the case? The worst case scenario is I could just wrap the beams with sheetrock, 1x's or something. The dark cedar dates the house so bad. Not to mention the ugly intercom system in every room.
 
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Old 12-06-06, 06:25 AM
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Are the beams solid wood? Most of the homes I painted that had beams like yours, the beams were just for looks. They were nailed to 2xs and were constructed of rough sawn 1xs.

Another option would be to paint them a lighter color with an exterior solid stain.
 
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Old 12-06-06, 10:08 AM
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I wish they were just boxed 1x's. They are solid rough cedar. Probably cost a pretty penny today. The original wood paneling has been painted. I never knew paneling was something a builder did. But it probably went with the 1974 theme of cheaper and easier. I was planning on putting pine 6" planks up in place of the aged drywall. It would be easier if at least the smaller sloping beams were gone. The ceiling joists on the one side almost certainly don't need the beams. I may have to have a pro look at it.
 
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Old 12-06-06, 01:47 PM
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If you have to keep the center beam (I'll bet the other two are cosmetic) - you might consider putting a drywall ceiling perpendicular to the bottom of the beam. You lose just a little bit of ceiling height - but it makes a nice "more contemporary look" than the "V" of a vaulted ceiling - and allows you to keep the center beam intact. /-\
 
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Old 12-06-06, 04:06 PM
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thezster...

Funny you should say that. I was telling my wife the other night I may just put a 4 foot wide strip of drywall up there to cover the main beam. I suppose the pine planking would work just as well. It would alleviate the concerns of taking it down and even lend itself to some can lights and a ceiling fan.
 
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