Self adhesive mesh tape

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  #1  
Old 01-10-07, 03:39 PM
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Self adhesive mesh tape

Can I lay down self adhesive mesh drywall tape on the seams first, them mud? Or do I have to mud first, then tape? I'm assuming because its a self adhesive tape I can lay it down first.

Also for inside corners I would use drywall tape, correct?
 
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Old 01-10-07, 04:13 PM
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That is how it was designed but in reality it doesn't always work well. I've heard that if you use a spray adhesive first that the sticky tape preforms better. What happens is the sticky tape looses some of it's adhesive quality and cracks appear later on. I have used old sticky tape that has lost it's sticky and embedding it in mud like paper tape - with long lasting success.

Paper tape is the only way to do the inside corners.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 07:45 PM
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Ok thanks

Also do you recommend sanding each application of mud or sanding it with a wet sponge? I'm in no hurry to finish my project so I am going to do thin coats of mud, sand, mud, sand,etc until done. Im just not sure if I should use sand paper or sponge??
 
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Old 01-10-07, 07:55 PM
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Skip the mesh, use paper tape.
 
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Old 01-11-07, 06:35 AM
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Sand paper or sanding screen on a sanding pole will do a better job but creates a lot of dust. A wet sanding sponge doesn't create any dust. It really depends on the job as to which one is best to use.

I usually only sand the final coat of mud. The neater the mud is applied the less need for sanding. If your 1st or 2nd coat have any ridges or humps they may need to be taken care of before applying more j/c. Always use care not to sand into the paper tape or paper face of the drywall.
 
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Old 01-11-07, 08:33 AM
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I think being able to skip the sandpaper and only use a wet sponge implies a level of skill in applying the mud that I'll never have. As Mark said, take out any ridges or humps in any coat with your drywall knife and then sand after the final coat.
 
  #7  
Old 01-11-07, 09:31 AM
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Thanks for the advise guys. I think to be able to finish drywall (perfectly so to speak) is like an art. I do not have that skill so I'm just taking my time and learning as I go.
 
  #8  
Old 01-11-07, 09:50 AM
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I get envious watching a pro do drywall knowing I'll never be able to do what they do. Just means the sandpaper manufacturers will never go out of business as long as I'm doing drywall.
 
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Old 01-11-07, 09:54 AM
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I detest having to sand so that gave me a lot of incentive to learn to apply the mud better. Personally I'd rather apply an extra coat of mud than to do extra sanding.
 
  #10  
Old 01-11-07, 11:36 AM
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The tip I find most useful as a novice drywaller is get a painters light with 25-40w bulb to look for defects. It allows you to see imperfections very easily. You'll also learn that with the right lighting you can hide alot of minor imperfections and likewise certian areas must be perfect or the room lighting will highlight the mistakes.
 
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