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cutting an arch in a Load bearing wall

cutting an arch in a Load bearing wall

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  #1  
Old 03-30-07, 04:27 PM
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Question cutting an arch in a Load bearing wall

I have a wall that is 15 feet long that is a load bearing wall in a single story frame. I need to cut out an archway that is approximately 4.5 ft in width. I will be cutting 18 inches from the ceiling. I will only be taking out 2 2x4s. As I have found the beams and will leave a beam at each side of the arch. How can I do this safely? And Easily?
Any and all help will be appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-31-07, 12:27 PM
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this isn't my field, but I would think that it would be possible. I think the safest way to accomplish this would be to place a small header at the ceiling in place of the studs you are removing. Unless the header must run from wall to wall.
 
  #3  
Old 03-31-07, 03:23 PM
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You need to have a header that will carry the load, supported on each end by 2x4's. The size of the header is determined both by the width of the opening and the load that is above it. You can then frame up your arch inside of this opening.
 
  #4  
Old 03-31-07, 03:35 PM
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If it's one story, the wall is only carrying the ceiling. Nevertheless, proper construction methods require you to install a header. It's overkill, but when I do this, I construct a temporary wall either side of the opening about two feet back giving me a 4' space to work (just a 2x4 plate top and bottom and two studs for each temp) Install a new double 2"x10" header with 2x4 stud and jack at either side. Make sure the jacks are above a good bearing point below (should be supported all the way to the foundation.) You are only removing a small amount of wall but you can never be sure how much weight it is carrying. Feel free to ask for more details
 
  #5  
Old 04-01-07, 08:16 AM
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A header is overkill but nontheless by code, its needed. The way I did it was make a header out of 2x10's sandwiched by 1/2" plywood. Then on either end of the header I held it up by placing 4x6 pressure treated posts. Its alittle much but you can never be too careful. This should be way more than enough. I hope this helps.
 
  #6  
Old 04-01-07, 09:44 AM
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No need for PT wood inside the home!

To clarify, when building a header use 2- 2xs with 1/2 plywood/osb in the middle = 3.5" thickness - same as a 2x4 width.
 
  #7  
Old 04-02-07, 07:14 AM
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No need but doesnt hurt either.
 
  #8  
Old 04-02-07, 04:25 PM
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Most PT wood has a higher moisture content than your typical framing lumber. Shrinking or twisting wood can affect the job.
 
  #9  
Old 04-03-07, 04:50 AM
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Your absolutely right but another reason was cost. The PT posts were less than half the non treated ones. At that point I had spend way more than enough on this project.
 
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