bad plaster walls

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-13-08, 03:30 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
bad plaster walls

we just bought a house that was built in 1942, and some of its walls were covered with wallpaper. After stripping off the wallpaper, most walls were in a rough shape, they had original paint, positive for lead, and flaky in many parts.
I was advised to prime it with an oil based primer, then plaster the whole wall with mud (or skim coat it). The problem is that they're big walls, especially on the staircase, and i have never done that before, and so worried that i won't end up with smooth surfaces (with no bumps and waves). I thought about installing thin dry wall sheets on the walls (1/4inch), as i have a thin baseboard and thin trims (and crown moldings), but i read that it might crack
Any suggestions?
Thanks!!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-14-08, 04:40 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,426
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
Welcome to the forums!

Either method should work although laminating the plaster with drywall is best done after removal of the woodwork. It would then need to be altered to fit the new, shorter dimensions.

Skim coating isn't quite so intimidating if you break it up into managable squares. You could do it in a checkerboard pattern and once the whole wall is coated and dry, sanding should level everything out. Any low spots can be recoated with joint compound.
 
  #3  
Old 10-17-08, 10:23 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks Mark
I think i'll use the drywall in the rooms where i don't have any crown molding, and attempt skim coating on the other walls!
What compound should i use? someone told me to get regular drywall compound (pre-mixed) while another told me to get a mixable mud like durabond 90
any suggestions?
Thanks a lot!
 
  #4  
Old 10-17-08, 01:46 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,426
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
Durabond is a little better but it is a lot harder to work with. You have a set amount of time to use it before it starts to harden and it is a bear to sand!!!! The ready mix joint compound will do a good job and is a lot more user friendly
 
  #5  
Old 10-17-08, 04:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks a lot for that!
2 last questions: I was told that 1/4' drywall is very hard to use and advised not to use it as it might crack, is that true? if i am careful in handling it, it would be ok right?
2, when i am fixing cracks in my lath and plaster walls, i was told to tape them - is it better to use tape or mesh? also, is it better to use the all purpose compound or the regular drywall compound?
Thanks!
 
  #6  
Old 10-18-08, 05:46 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,426
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
I suppose it is easier to damage 1/4" during transport and/or handling but it is lighter and easier to pick up

Taping is almost always better at keeping the crack sealed although it takes a little more work to hide the repair. Paper tape is better than mesh tape. Mesh tape tends to develop cracks over time. The only way around this with mesh tape is to use durabond over it.

I don't often do any painting/repairs on plaster homes but when I do - if it's a crack I'm not overly concerned about, I'll scratch it out and fill with durabond. I'f I believe it's a crack that will come back - I mud and tape it.

I'm not sure what you mean by general purpose and regular joint compound
The regular general purpose j/c with the green lid, adheres the best and dries the hardest [but not as hard as durabond] The blue and purple lid are light weight and sand easier.
 
  #7  
Old 10-28-08, 01:21 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My experience: DIYer level. Non-pro. Perfectionist. Home built: 1898 Grandfather's home built: ~1920's (also helped repair this home's walls)

You said you want:
"with no bumps and waves"

Yeah...

It all depends on how much work you want to make this, how good you want it to look and how long you want it to last. There's different ways you can go:

Method 1: Easiest way, looks bad, won't last
If you want to do it the easy way, sure, skim coat it like someone told you. If you want my opinion on that, it's a total waste of time unless you're selling it next week. Plan on seeing whatever "bumps and waves" are there now just as plainly when you're done as when you started. And plan on those cracks returning real soon too. That is, unless you taped them all and feathered them out real clean. Man, that's a lot of work. Hey that's just my opinion.

Method 2: Easy, looks so-so, lasts.
On 1/4" gypsum board: Yes, it cracks very easily. It's pure crap, get some real stuff. And either way, you have to take down the trim to do it right. But if you want the easy way out, you can get so-so results by "cheating" and using this stuff and not taking down the trim. It still would be a lot better than the skim coat approach. Be prepared to spend the money you're saving on 1/4" board in extra 1/4" board (because you broke half of what you bought) or in extra frustration.

Method 3: easy, looks good, lasts
Use 1/2" gypsum board. It's the same as the above except you'll have to take down the trim and re-cut it like marksr said, before putting it back up. You'll need a miter saw for this, but you can get a hand saw/ miter block combo for about $10-15 and it's really not much work to cut trim boards by hand. You'll end up with a job you can be proud of and will last just about forever.

Method 4: messy hard work, looks new, lasts, is compatible
In my mind, this is the only real way to do it, but I admit it's a lot of messy, hard work. And that is to get the plaster the heck outta there! Knock that crap down, tear down the lath boards and expose the studs. Maybe now is the time you want to add some insulation, or sound-deadening material to keep the house quieter. When it's all swept up, go ahead and screw up some nice 1/2" gypsum board. Now you'll have a wall that not only looks great, but it will also be fully up-to-date with the way things are done "these days." I've found this to be a real advantage when you want to go and do things like add wiring or wall-plates for things. Maybe you want to add a light switch or whatever. Who knows what you'll want to do!? It's just really nice to have a wall that has a standard thickness to it. I've run ino lots of trouble on "drywall over plaster and lath" walls before. When it's all done, you'll never be sorry. On the other hand, I admit you might think this is over-kill for your particular application. Whatever you do, try to plan for the future. Good luck!
 
  #8  
Old 10-28-08, 01:29 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Oh, one more thing. If price is no object, get the pre-mixed joint compound, and while you're at it, get the light weight stuff in the light blue container that costs a few more bucks per gallon. On the othe hand, if you're not a rich billionaire tycoon, get the stuff you mix yourself. Pick up a mixing attachment for your 3/8" electric drill, a 5 gallon bucket if you don't have one, and mix it yourself! You have way more control over your drying-time so you can get more done in less time. I find that it shrinks less, sands easier, and saves a ridiculous amount of money. But again, that's just my opinion.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: