Bubbled drywall seam


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Old 11-29-08, 10:42 AM
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Bubbled drywall seam

I have seen some information regarding the cause, and cure, for this situation, mainly found in the early stages. Hoping to get a little more detail more specific to my situation, already finished

About 60% of the horizontal seam on my wall is showing a bubble, approx 1/4 in wide. I did not see this prior to priming and painting the wall, but now it is VERY obvious. What can I do now ?? Can I simply cut the bubble with a utility knife, then apply compound over it to fill the gap ?? Will this fix my issue ?

Need some help please !!!
 
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Old 11-29-08, 11:05 AM
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Peel off everything that is loose, reapply tape to any exposed seam, apply mud, sand, texture, primer and paint.
 
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Old 11-29-08, 11:20 AM
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Do I absolutely need to peel off the tape, and reapply ?? Is there an easier way ??
 
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Old 11-29-08, 03:44 PM
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You need to cut out the bubbled tape, you don't have to peel off any well stuck tape although sometimes that may make the repair easier. Retaping will garuntee no cracks in the joint compound. If you just mud in the areas you removed - it will probably crack over time.
 
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Old 11-29-08, 04:11 PM
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Is it an air bubble, or is it right down the middle of the tape? Sometimes when taping over a gap, say 1/4", the pressure on the fromt of the knife will cause the mud to lift the tape behind the knife. Then it is just a ridge and you have to deal with it with a ton more feathering.

If you decide to remove the tape and re-apply, a sponge with a little water, emphasis on a little water, will soften the mud to make it easy.
Bud
 
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Old 11-30-08, 07:55 PM
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I personally think it is an air bubble. I did infact have a gap in some places at the "Seam". My basement got flooded this summer, so I cut the old drywall up just above the 4ft mark so I could put a new sheet in perfectly (no trimming). My "seams" were not as perfect as if it was 2 ends of new drywall joining together. I am thinking this could have something to do with it though.

I am not sure how I would replace just the 1/4" to 1/2" wide part of the tape if I were to cut out the bubble. Really not wanting to undo what I have done, but dont want to look at the horrible seam either.

Any other ideas ???
 
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Old 11-30-08, 08:32 PM
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Again, is it in the middle, over that gap? Since whatever you end up doing to make it go away means you will have to paint again, test it to see if it really is loose tape, i.e. a bubble. Cut a small section with a razor blade to see if the tape lifts up. If the tape lifts up, its a bubble, if the tape is stuck to the plaster, it is a bump. Let us know.
Bud
 
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Old 12-01-08, 07:50 PM
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It is in the middle over the gap.

I used a utility knife and made a slit in the "bubble". I was then able to press the bubble flat and make it disappear. All that can be seen is the small slit where I cut the bubble. I did not cut out any tape, I simply "pierced" the bubble and it went flat.

Now hope I can just hide the slit with either a little bit of paint or a small amount of compound. Will either of these options cause this to happen again ??
 
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Old 12-01-08, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by shaggyb View Post
It is in the middle over the gap.
Now hope I can just hide the slit with either a little bit of paint or a small amount of compound. Will either of these options cause this to happen again ??
Give it a try but it will probably pop right back out when you get it wet with paint or mud.
 
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Old 12-02-08, 02:33 AM
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For that to work you need to force mud under the slit so it can 'glue' it back to the wall.
 
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Old 12-02-08, 04:14 AM
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Unhappy New drywall getting moist

New drywall getting moist I have a question that is baffling. We have just converted an old attached garage into living space. We raised the floor using 2x 16x20 The floor trusses do not touch the concrete they are above them approximately 10 Concrete below We them put three layers of T&G plywood on the floor, (I know it is over kill but we miscalculated the height to match exactly with the existing house floor.) Anyway we insulated all exterior and interior walls. The west-facing wall is showing signs of light moisture at the lower edge. There is No windows or plumbing on that wall. Upon checking the upstairs attic we found no signs of moisture coming down the wall. This wall is the peak side of the house. The roof us new. The outside of the house is vinyl sided. I did note a house wrap on the wall visible in the attic. We did note that at the bottom near the floor there seemed to be a little cold air when we installed the drywall. We are not sure if we stuffed all the cavities below the floor with insulation. This moisture is only slight with no pooling or pudding and dries quickly with a fan blowing on it. The walls are not finished so removing the drywall can be done if required to correct the problem. Last year on that wall before we started this project the walls had 2 windows (that were removed for this project.) there was paneling over the walls and around the windows. We did see Ice in the corners around the windows on the paneling. Upon removing the paneling we noted there was no insulation in those areas. There was insulated in all other areas and no problems. The entire walls were insulated with faced insulation. But as I said earlier the floors were raised then the walls insulated. We live in the northern middle region of Ohio. The room is not heated yet and stays approximately 55-60 degrees during 15-25 degrees outside. Please help quickly so we can complete the project. Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 12-02-08, 06:21 AM
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update

Ok I cut lower edge of drywall up about 12" removed and found drywall was only wet on the inside of the board side toward house the back side was bone dry. any suggestions?
 
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Old 12-02-08, 08:47 AM
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The water has to be coming from somewhere. You will have to track it down. Does the sheetrock contact the floor? Has there been any activity in the room? How long has it been sitting there installed?
 
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Old 12-02-08, 12:29 PM
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The sheet rock has only been down two weeks. Still in the mudding process. It does not touch the floor the floor is just plywood.
 
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Old 12-02-08, 03:50 PM
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You mentioned that the bottom of the wall is cold. You are mudding, i. e. moisture. Could the moisture/water you are seeing simply be condensation?
Bud
 
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Old 12-02-08, 04:50 PM
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thats what I am thinking too but have just never seen such a thing. And when we get done and have the wall painted will it stop?
 
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Old 12-03-08, 02:38 AM
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Is there a vapor barrier over the insulation between it and the drywall?

I don't know if that is the cause..... just a random thought.
 
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Old 12-03-08, 03:13 AM
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yes there is a vapor barrier it is craft faced
 
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Old 12-03-08, 04:42 AM
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If it is condensation, you may want to investigate the reason that wall area is colder than expected. Once you get the moisture/humidity under control you should have less of a problem, but for the current discussion and future heat loss considerations, now is a better time than later to investigate.
Bud
 
 

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