How to repair walls


  #1  
Old 08-23-10, 02:55 PM
C
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How to repair walls

I spent about a week removing wall paper from my kitchen and bathroom that were was hung about 14 years ago over builder paint without priming walls. I tried many methods, chemicals and even a rented wall paper streamer. The walls are really uneven now. I have tried using joint compound and sanding but honestly it is like I need to use joint compound on the entire wall. I took a sample paint can and just put some satin finish paint up to see and it looks terrible. I really don't want a flat paint in my kitchen!
(and am not sure that is going to look much better!)


Is there something I can use to try to even out the surface of my walls?

I wanted to paint into my family room (which did not have wallpaper previously....) and I don't really want to sponge tape to hid it.

HELP!

Christine
 
  #2  
Old 08-24-10, 04:33 AM
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Welcome to the forums Christine!

Ain't stripping wallpaper fun

If you have removed as much wallpaper as feasible, prime the walls with either zinnser's gardz or an oil base primer. When that dries you'll need to skim coat the walls with joint compound [just enough to hide the defects] After the j/c dries, use a sanding pole [or anything that holds the sandpaper flat] to smooth it out. Add j/c and resand as necessary.

Do your painted walls have a texture? or are they slick finish?
 
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Old 08-24-10, 06:18 AM
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Thanks. I did get all the wallpaper off. And feel all the glue is gone as well. I did prime with a oil base and then did joint compound/sand on the largest issues. There were parts were it seems maybe the tape on the sheet rock came off. Other parts it seems whatever it was under the paper, I would think builder grade spray paint, speckled off. So while there are some large uneven areas, the walls in general now are all uneven, if that makes sense.

I put a semi gloss on the wall in just one area as a test - in most light, it looks ok......but at night with light from the kitchen and family room - not so much!

I would like to go without a texture if I can. But I also don't really want to put a flat paint in my kitchen!

A friend last night mentioned some kind of paper primer that smooths the wall and then you paint over that? Never heard of it but it sounds like painting over wallpaper that has enough of its own issues! Wish I could afford to have a contractor come in and resheetrock! Or make the jerk that I paid to wallpaper come do this! My husband and I put up and took down wallpaper in what the kids nursery in this same home. We primed the walls before the wallpaper and when it was time to change it - we scored it - sprayed it - made a mess there was not damage to the walls - we were painting within days.

Adding to my frustration is I spent the entire weekend priming and then painting my ceiling in the kitchen and into my family room stupidly using Lowes ceiling paint. The primer looked better and I now I still need to redo it.

UGH! Any suggestions?! Beer 4U2
 
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Old 08-24-10, 06:57 AM
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You're in skim coat territory now

Keep in mind paint usually makes imperfections in the wall more noticable, not less, so they have to be pretty close to perfect before you paint
 
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Old 08-24-10, 09:28 AM
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It can be difficult to sand latex paint/primer - it likes to gum up the sandpaper

Identify the low areas and add more j/c. Then sand with a pole sander or anything that will keep a 1/2 sheet of sandpaper flat. That prevents your fingers from pushing in and out making the sanded j/c wavy.

USG makes a primer called 1st coat. It is sprayed on [might can be rolled] and helps to level out the differences between where the j/c is and the bare drywall paper. It would have minimal if any benefit for your issues.
 
 

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