drywall ceiling with 45 degree angle


  #1  
Old 10-13-10, 04:30 PM
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drywall ceiling with 45 degree angle

Hi,
Can someone please help me? I'm trying to drywall a ceiling and walls. The ceiling has a angle about 3 feet wide so do I drywall that part first or the flat part of the ceiling first.
Thanks in advance for any help!!!!

Tinamaca
P.S. It's the wall comes up from floor then there's this 3-4 foot part of the wall and ceiling that sort of curve then there's the ceiling. How do I go about sheetrocking the curve part? Is that something I would do before the ceiling part where it's already flat?
Thanks for any help.
 

Last edited by Tinamaca; 10-13-10 at 05:51 PM.
  #2  
Old 10-13-10, 06:19 PM
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I always start with the lid first, and work my way down. You should try to get a nice fit where the 45 degree piece meets the ceiling. To make a nice 45, cut the paper on the back side of the drywall, making a cut about 1/2" away at a 45. Then remove that 1/2" of paper, shave the back side of the drywall away with your knife, and rasp it with a drywall rasp. But don't bugger up the paper that is going to be on the front side. If you gouge that paper at all it will have to be cut off before you tape.

Only worry about getting one side to look nice. As long as you are within 1/2" of the opposite wall, that side will be covered up by the next piece, which will also have a 45 cut on one end.

If you have a curve, well, that's a little harder to explain. And it depends on the radius of the curve too. Some curves can be done by using 2 layers of 1/4" sheetrock since it will bend. I've also heard that some ppl will wet the back side to help it bend. Other times, it's best to slice the back side of the drywall into strips, bust the sheet (while not breaking or cutting the front side of the paper) and have a couple people help you hold that piece up while you screw each "slice" up. It takes a lot of screws, but you can form a pretty decent curve doing it that way. And mudding will take care of the rest. But 1/4" sheetrock is a lot easier if the curve is gradual- especially if you get the stuff that specifically says it is flexible 1/4" rock.
 
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Old 10-13-10, 08:52 PM
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Hey XSleeper,
Thanks so much for the advice. I"m going tomorrow to pick up the flexible 1/4 rock and let ya know how I do! I really appreciate you answering my ? because I had no idea about the flexible rock.
Have a Great day and thanks sooo much once again!!
Tinamaca
 
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Old 10-13-10, 09:04 PM
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No problem! But you might call ahead, to make sure they have it in stock. I wouldn't say that it's a common item that everyplace would keep it in stock.
 
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Old 10-14-10, 06:14 AM
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If the radius of the curve is too small, another way of applying 1/4" sheetrock is to pre from it assume that you have the required time.

Just secure the sheetrock with 2x to the surface and press it against the curved surface just before the braking point. Next day press it again by 2-3 and so on until it almost fit. Took me 3 days once to do a similar job
 
 

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