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AAAhhh, need help with tenant's smells!

AAAhhh, need help with tenant's smells!

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  #1  
Old 12-25-00, 06:29 PM
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Question

Hi, I bought a two family apartment house and it's great. My tenants are also great, but when they cook (they are vietnamese), the smell goes through the ceiling or something right up to my apartment (they are 1st floor, I'm 2nd). I don't know what to do, the smells are driving me crazy they are so bad! Who would I contact to fix something like this? I was thinking blown in insulation or something in their ceiling.

Please help, I'm willing to do almost anything (no, I'm not going to kick them out)!

Thanks!
Ron
 
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  #2  
Old 12-25-00, 06:58 PM
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I doubt insulation would do much good. Consider a vented hood and insist they do their cooking under it with the fan on. I know what you are going through, while in college I inspected married housing and 70% of the housed population was foriegn and half of them were Chinese. There were apartments where the cooking oils/grease had literally disenegrated the drywall. You could push your fingers right through it. Good luck Don C.
 
  #3  
Old 12-25-00, 10:54 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,952
Cool

Must be primarily the ubiquitous Vietnamese basic, nouc mam (sp?) sauce, that has such a pungent odor (I believe that it is made out of aged fish blood).
I agree with Don. Insulation in the ceiling is not going to help you.
Venting to the outside will help most, as Don recommended.
Also, do you share the same forced air central heat/ac system? The return is going to pull in cooking odors, and a normal dust filter is not going to keep them from getting redistributed.
If you do, perhaps using allergy filters will help you. They're expensive, but you can get the washable type, and rinse them out with hose once a month (what I do with mine to keep them clean). Might help.
If their kitchen has an outside wall, I would install a 10" louvered exhaust fan with a 540-cfm 1/30th hp motor in it, preferably over the stove. (Available from W.W. Grainger for less than $150).
That's what I'm using as a crawlspace exhaust fan, and it's a lot more powerful than a normal range vent fan. Out is better than up.
Good Luck!


 
  #4  
Old 12-27-00, 10:31 AM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 3,140
I am not going to say a word about cooking dog and cat.
 
  #5  
Old 12-27-00, 11:56 AM
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Exclamation Thanks for the info, here's another question on the same subject!

I'm not sure how well I can vent to the outside, are the ductless range hoods any good? I imagine they use a filtration system, but am not sure how well they capture odors realistically.

Here's the layout of their kitchen (1st floor)



Ok, hopefully it's not too confusing, basically, the stove is on an inside wall with really no place else to go (the outside wall has 2 big windows and old steam radiator preventing the stove from going there. If I wanted to vent this, how would I? I don't think their ceiling (my floor) is thick enough for ductwork, though the basement is easily accessible, could I put the ductwork down the Chimney duct and vent down and out of the basement? I know I don't want to vent directly into the chimney duct as the smells would just travel up the chimney duct into my apartment (actually, I think this is how a lot of the smell gets up my way).

Thanks all for your help in this smelly situation!
Ron

[Edited by rwilkins108 on 12-27-00 at 03:30]
 
  #6  
Old 12-27-00, 01:03 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,952
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A ductless range hood is not going to do you any good, and venting a range into a chimney flue under use (combustible fuel heating system? fireplace?) would be a fire hazard and against all codes, I would think. If your chimney flue is not being used for a heating system or anything else, then you may be able to use it.
It should vent all the way up and out.
You must vent these cooking odors outside.
If you can't vent up through the chimney, I would vent it over the range, and run flat ductwork between your floor joists through the outside wall. Or, if the ceiling/floor joists are running crossways, then I would run the flat ductwork right onto the ceiling.
That's the only way that you're going to get rid of most of the odor...OUT!
Good Luck!
 
  #7  
Old 12-27-00, 02:25 PM
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Thanks

Thanks OldGuy, one quick thing, by Chimney Duct, I didn't mean the flue, but the space between the walls and the outside of the chimney (chimney's in the middle of the house) but you've given me enough to work with!

Thanks!
 
  #8  
Old 12-27-00, 03:19 PM
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Depending on the age of your house, and the type of furnace you have, you may be able to run two separate exhausts out your chimney. I've seen this done on homes that have been converted to multiple units where each unit has it's own furnace. Everything around here is natural gas, so I assume that is what it was done with. Talk to a hvac contractor in your area. They should know if this is possible by design and code for your area. Don C.
 
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