Old/Dense Studs


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Old 03-07-11, 03:02 PM
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Old/Dense Studs

Hi...I'm currently in the process of replacing drywall in an extremely old kitchen. When I try to screw in the new drywall, the screws only go into the 4x4 stud part way. I'm using 1-5/8" drywall screws and 1/2" lafarge drywall. It seems like the screws stop about 5/8" short.

On the vertical part of the frame (2x4) sometimes the screws go in the entire way, however there are times where they stop about 5/8" short.

I though about some type of metal beam going thru the studs or even the possibility of a knot, but it seems to be the same scenario throughout the entire frame.

What is the best advice? Pilot holes? Or maybe shorter screws? I also even thought about trying to use a little 3-in-1 oil on the end of the screw.

Any advice would help...Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 03-07-11, 03:51 PM
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Old wood can be hard hard hard! Had to tear out a stud wall in an old (1930-1940) warehouse. Tried to reuse some studs...you could seriously NOT drive a 12 penny nail into them.

Don't use the oil...but you might try using a bar of soap and just scrape the threads through it. Paraffin might also work. Test it first on an exposed stud. Otherwise you may have to pre-drill. Hmmmm....would 1 1/4 screws work? Thats still 3/4 into the wood...should be fine, especially as hard/strong as it is.

I'm surprised the heads didn't snap off....
 
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Old 03-07-11, 04:46 PM
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Thanks--appreciate the advice. I'm gonna try a 1-1/8" screw tomorrow; I have some paraffin here as well. I already lost a 5/64" drill bit (which was probably on its last leg anyway) trying to drill pilot holes. I'm hoping that if I can get that 1-1/8" at least right at the surface, spackling will cover any bumps.
 
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Old 03-08-11, 03:30 AM
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You may want to invest in an impact driver, too. It makes driving screws into "iron-like" wood easier. Don't go any shorter than 1 1/8", as you need to have at least 1/2 the screw length in the wood.
 
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Old 03-08-11, 04:26 AM
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You want the screw head recessed a little!! It would be nightmare to finish over the 'bumps' and make them look decent.
 
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Old 03-10-11, 05:04 PM
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Hey Chandler...I went to the Home Depot and invested in one of those 18v 1/4" Ryobi impact drivers (and bought a titanium drill bit set in the process). It's not top-of-the-line, but it's the absolutely perfect tool for the job with the 1-1/8" screws. I really appreciate the advice. It's definitely smooth sailing now compared to where I was a few days ago. The bonus is I won't have any type of drilling accessory need for quite some time. Thanks again.
 
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Old 03-10-11, 05:15 PM
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Glad it worked out for you. Now, if you'll step down here to the tool forum, we can get you started right on the tools you need................ Sorry, couldn't help it!!!!!!!!!
 
 

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