Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Walls and Ceilings
Reload this Page >

Bathroom remodel (sheetrock wall question)

Bathroom remodel (sheetrock wall question)

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-29-11, 04:05 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 193
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Bathroom remodel (sheetrock wall question)

We are now in the process of remodeling our bathroom and tearing down the old tile that was on the wall. Some of it is tearing some of the paper off of the sheetrock. Do I need to worry about that or not? We are going to just smooth out the old texture and put a slight orange peel over it. I have seen a sheetrock repair product that is supposed to fix paper tears on sheetrock. What is your opinion and advice? Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 03-29-11, 04:30 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
How much of a remodel are you doing? I find it best to gut the room, determine what you want and need for the new bathroom, then start back up with fresh "stuff". You can skim coat the drywall if you want to, then apply your finish. I was just wondering for the others who may have other ideas.
 
  #3  
Old 03-29-11, 04:41 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 193
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
We are gutting all fixtures from window to tub to vanity and floor. Toilet is new. The only thing we would leave in the room would be the toilet. I will replace the sheet rock if deemed necessary but the majority of it is in good condition.
I was planning on skim coating but wondered if putting something over the paper tears is important?
 
  #4  
Old 03-29-11, 06:28 PM
coops28's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 1,752
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
replace the drywall that the tile was on. It will be easier and cheaper in the long run.
 
  #5  
Old 03-29-11, 07:31 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,857
Received 83 Votes on 78 Posts
Next to impossible to get torn paper repaired so it does not show. I'd also bet if it's an older home it have the wrong sheetrock in there any way.
It should be paperless sheetrock. There is no paper just a thin layer of fiberglass so there's nothing for mold to eat.
Tile should never be laid over sheetrock of any kind in a wet area like a tub. That area needs tile board, and it needs to be water proofed with a product like red guard. Plus all the seams need to be tape with tile board tape and thin set.
 
  #6  
Old 03-30-11, 04:51 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Another reason for total gut out if it is on an outside wall is to upgrade insulation. As a matter of fact more modern bathrooms are totally insulated on all walls for reduced sound transmission, so it's just another log on the fire to remove the drywall and replace with new. Wiring can be modified or upgraded, you can move your fixtures to suit your new needs, add fixtures if you want, add another receptacle for "her" stuff. Just a better idea.
 
  #7  
Old 03-30-11, 05:32 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,844
Received 361 Votes on 318 Posts
I agree there are many good reasons to replace the drywall but it you must repair what's there, you need to first coat the exposed gypsum with either an oil base primer or Zinnser's Gardz. This will seal the exposed gypsum so the moisture from the joint compound or latex paint/primer won't cause the surrounding paper to start peeling.
 
  #8  
Old 03-30-11, 05:43 AM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 193
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have decided to replace the drywall. I do think after looking at it that it will be easier and nicer in the long run.
 
  #9  
Old 03-30-11, 06:02 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
You'll be happier....................................
 
  #10  
Old 04-13-11, 05:31 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 193
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I took down all the walls and am going to use new blue rock. I have run into a little craziness that can be solved but want some opinions. One of the things was some electrical wiring had been spliced behind the wall with only tape and no box. Got that fixed so no problem anymore. The other problem is the air vent that runs up to the attic is causing a little problem. I always wondered why my sheet rock always seemed to have a little bulge behind my toilet (that is where the vent is). Well, the vent actually sticks out almost a half inch past the 2x4 which they used for walls there. They had bent the sheet rock somehow and molded it against the pipe. What do you think would be the best way to go about with the new sheet rock? Just curious what others would do. Thanks.
 
  #11  
Old 04-13-11, 06:54 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 1,920
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
Rip some 1/2" plywood and nail it to the edges of the studs thus making the studs flush with the vent and then add the drywall and it should end up flat. if you need to you could add 5/8" instead or even fur it out with 1 X 2.
 
  #12  
Old 04-13-11, 06:59 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 193
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I wonder how they got the sheet rock to fit. You don't notice it much because it is behind the toilet but my gosh, some of these builders are just cheap.
 
  #13  
Old 04-14-11, 05:34 AM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 193
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay, let me see if I can explain why this my not work to do that. The tub is about18" away from the toilet. The guy that built the bathroom made it exactly 60" wide and 12' long. The tub I have is 60" long. 59 1/2" of wall won't work. Ideas?
 
  #14  
Old 04-14-11, 07:42 AM
E
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,051
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What exactly is the air vent for running into your attic? First is it running into or through your attic and up through your roof? Nothing should vent directly into your attic cold zone. Is this an air exhaust metal vent pipe or a plumbing 'stink stack' vent? Just trying to understand if there is any possible option to size down on the vent pipe. Is the tub attached directly to the wall studs or are you saying that the wall board is included in the 60" length of space for the 60" tub dimension? Tubs should be attached directly to studs. Backer board should not be behind it. Also when you said you corrected the wiring violation I hope you ran a complete new wire and did not conceal a junction box. Did you also install GFI protection on all recepticles and ensure all were also 36" from a water source in case they were not meeting current code?
 
  #15  
Old 04-14-11, 07:49 AM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 193
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by equinox View Post
What exactly is the air vent for running into your attic? First is it running into or through your attic and up through your roof? Nothing should vent directly into your attic cold zone. Is this an air exhaust metal vent pipe or a plumbing 'stink stack' vent? Just trying to understand if there is any possible option to size down on the vent pipe. Is the tub attached directly to the wall studs or are you saying that the wall board is included in the 60" length of space for the 60" tub dimension? Tubs should be attached directly to studs. Backer board should not be behind it. Also when you said you corrected the wiring violation I hope you ran a complete new wire and did not conceal a junction box. Did you also install GFI protection on all recepticles and ensure all were also 36" from a water source in case they were not meeting current code?
It is the vent for the water drain of toilet, sinks etc. It has to run up through the attic.
 
  #16  
Old 04-14-11, 11:56 AM
E
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,051
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If it is not a main vent stack, only a 2" vent is required for a single toilet and bath fixtures providing that the venting pipes are attached to the stack higher than 6 inches from the floor. 2 toilets require a 3" vent. Just asking because unless this vent also serves another bathroom you might be able to reduce it to fit inside the 2x4 wall. You are otherwise limited it sounds like to how it was all done before.
 
  #17  
Old 04-14-11, 01:01 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 193
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It is the main stack that runs from the drains downstairs through the upstairs.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: