bumps in ceiling


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Old 09-01-11, 02:38 PM
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bumps in ceiling

I have bumps in my ceiling. The upstairs neighbors were making a lot of noise, I regretfully lost my temper and damaged the ceiling (banged it with a hammer). A great deal of damage has occurred. I attempted to fix it with a filler but you could still see the damage and number of smaller bumps appeared. How do I repair the ceiling? i live an apartment and the ceiling is white plain. I will up load a photo if needed to give better idea of the damage and type of ceiling. Any help would be greatly appreciated and is much needed
 
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Old 09-01-11, 04:21 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Did you just dent the ceiling or did the hammer head go thru the drywall?

pics would help - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 09-01-11, 04:40 PM
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Deep dents will take at least 2 coats of joint compound to fill them. The wet mud shrinks back a little each time. You'll need to sand it once you wipe it down for the final time. Resist the urge to overfill, it just makes more sanding. Then you will probably want to paint with flat ceiling white when ur done. In all likelihood the whole ceiling will need to be cut in and rolled.
 
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Old 09-01-11, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Deep dents will take at least 2 coats of joint compound to fill them. The wet mud shrinks back a little each time. You'll need to sand it once you wipe it down for the final time. Resist the urge to overfill, it just makes more sanding. Then you will probably want to paint with flat ceiling white when ur done. In all likelihood the whole ceiling will need to be cut in and rolled.
First I want to thank you for all your help. So I use joint compound, I was using a lower quality filler which might be the reason I am having trouble with the finish, a quick question what do you mean by cut in and rolled?

thanks again

Welcome to the forums!

Did you just dent the ceiling or did the hammer head go thru the drywall?

pics would help - How To Put Pictures In Your Post
I'm not sure what type of ceiling it is, but it is a concrete ceiling covered (finished ) with compound, its not a drywall. I will get you pics as soon as I find my camera.

thanks marksr for all your help, i'm very appreciative
 

Last edited by serenity; 09-01-11 at 06:55 PM.
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Old 09-01-11, 09:30 PM
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Concrete? I was assuming it was drywall. They probably sprayed a texture on it, and you've damaged the texture. I'll shut up and wait for the pics.
 
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Old 09-02-11, 06:43 PM
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pics

This the type of ceiling... Iím not sure which kind it is, but itís concrete and covered with some type of compound, its quite thick.. 2 inches


The repair was very patchy you canít see it in the photo but there are smaller holes and you can still notice the dents


This is the damage, gives you a better idea how severe it is
 
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Old 09-05-11, 10:01 AM
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Probably every hammer blow compressed the plaster and also raised a little ridge around the edges. First scrape the ceiling so the raised places are flattened then use a setting type joint compound to fill the divots. Don't try to fill it all in one coat. You will get much better results using two or maybe even three thin coats than one heavy coat and trying to build it out all at once. Put a coat on each hole then wipe it flush with your taping knife. Just as the mud sets wipe it with a damp cloth to keep the surrounding edges clean. When set give it another treatment and then maybe even another one. Then sand, prime the whole ceiling and repaint it. After you prime it you should be able to tell if your repairs are satisfactory. If they need another coat do it then then prime and paint. If they are still raised maybe you can sand after you prime then prime again and paint.
The satisfaction of a job well done will be worth the extra time and frustration you spend on fixing this.
 
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Old 09-11-11, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by tightcoat View Post
Probably every hammer blow compressed the plaster and also raised a little ridge around the edges. First scrape the ceiling so the raised places are flattened then use a setting type joint compound to fill the divots. Don't try to fill it all in one coat. You will get much better results using two or maybe even three thin coats than one heavy coat and trying to build it out all at once. Put a coat on each hole then wipe it flush with your taping knife. Just as the mud sets wipe it with a damp cloth to keep the surrounding edges clean. When set give it another treatment and then maybe even another one. Then sand, prime the whole ceiling and repaint it. After you prime it you should be able to tell if your repairs are satisfactory. If they need another coat do it then then prime and paint. If they are still raised maybe you can sand after you prime then prime again and paint.


The satisfaction of a job well done will be worth the extra time and frustration you spend on fixing this.
Thank you for responding to my post tighcoat. I have another predicament. The prior repair I attempted smaller started to appear as I filled in the cavities, they're very tiny, its hard to cover them with the plaster. How do I fix these defects?

(I was thinking of applying more plaster and using an electric sander. Any other electric tool which would be recommended for this job?)
 
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Old 09-11-11, 08:28 PM
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How hard is the cn coating on the ceilig? When you hit it with the hammer was hard and sounded hard or was in punky?

Exactly what are you using for the repairs? Some materials shrink as they dry and two or more coats to repair. Remember scrape off the bumps next to the divots first. More thin coats are better.
If what is on the concrete is about 2" thick it might be some kind of fireproofing or soundproofing material. Softer is more difficult to repair than harder.
 
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Old 09-11-11, 10:33 PM
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thanks again for responding so quickly. I'm a complete newbie to ceiling repairs, i'm not sure by some of the terminology, what is cn coating? The material is soft, when i struck the hammer into the ceiling it easily went through, it's soft material.

I'm using a filler which you mix with water that I bought from walmart. I don't believe there is any shrinking. the tiny holes appear right after i cover the cavities.

It seems its softer material.

should I use an electric sander or any other electric tool recommendation, which would make the job easier ?
 
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Old 09-14-11, 02:24 PM
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cn is typo. should read
How hard is the coating on the ceiling?

If the ceiling is soft and you put something harder in the divots then try to sand them no matter how you sand it it will sand the soft stuff off and leave a bump where you patched it.

Can you zooom in on the spot in the last picture that is a little right of center and a little above center and a darker color.

I think you have some kind of sprayed on sound proofing or fire proofing. When you hit it with the hammer did it sound like you were hitting concrete or did it sound like you were hitting your sofa?
 
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Old 09-17-11, 08:31 AM
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It sounded like hitting a sofa. I've patched up the dents using joint compound. I can provide pictures of the repair, its uneven and rough, when i sand it gaps appear back again. I don't know what to do? (would painting it make a difference)
 
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Old 09-21-11, 08:19 AM
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This must be sound proofing or fireproofing of some kind. Patching something soft with something harder is not a good idea.
How smooth is the ceiling? Is there any texture to it?
Yes painting will help. It will toughen, not harden the material so you can patch it with a little more success. When you sand you are sanding the softer material away from your patch. Also paint should help the bond of the patching material to the existing.
You want to work your patch as little as possible. The moisture in your joint compound softens the surrounding soft stuff and it wants to peel away. Paint will help this.

Is the ceiling material really 2" thick. You should be able to poke an awl or a sharp, thin knife into it until you hit the concrete above then measure the true thickness. You might be able to use a softer material to patch it. Some high resolution, contrasty pictures of the undamaged texture or smoothness and some pictures of your repairs would be helpful.

It's been so long since we have heard from you that maybe you figured it out. If so tell us what worked.
 
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Old 10-04-11, 11:29 AM
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I sure would like to know how serenity addressed his problem and how it worked out.
 
 

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