Popcorn Ceiling Droops????

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Old 12-08-11, 11:37 AM
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Exclamation Popcorn Ceiling Droops????

Hello,

Odd question. What is causing my popcorn ceiling to droop? I've included a picture to illustrate what I mean. I'd *love* to remove the popcorn ceiling, but I'm afraid of what lies underneath if the ceiling is doing this. Also, it is good to note that the popcorn does crack in spots. It has been painted over with a latex paint before we bought the house.

 
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Old 12-08-11, 12:02 PM
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Do you know how thick the drywall is or the span between joists?

Are you sure it's the texture and not the drywall?
 
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Old 12-08-11, 01:06 PM
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Could it be the drywall? Can drywall do that? I'm clueless in this situation! I'm not sure how thick it is... If it is the drywall, is my only solution to rip it down and replace it? What could be causing this?
 
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Old 12-08-11, 01:24 PM
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Drywall can sag and your drawing makes me think that is the case - how far apart are the high spots? If it's the drywall, I'll bet you find a consistent measurement, like every 16 or 24 inches.
 
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Old 12-08-11, 01:35 PM
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I haven't measured (I'm at work right now) but each of the high spots are equal distance apart. The very last sag, there is a crack that goes all across the room width and then on the other side of that crack, the sagging stops.

Please don't tell me this is water damage?
 
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Old 12-08-11, 02:57 PM
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Doesn't sound like water damage, though it could be, it sounds like the drywall which was installed was not thick enough for the span between the ceiling joists and its sagging under its own weight (plus that of the texture and paint).

In general, you need 1/2" thick drywall for 16" on center joists and 5/8" thick for 24" on center joists.
 
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Old 12-08-11, 03:23 PM
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I'll measure tonight and see what the span is between the joists. You've got me going in the right direction! Thanks, mitch!
 
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Old 12-08-11, 05:07 PM
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I've seen it a lot and it's almost always 1/2" drywall hung on rafters that have 24" spacing. Humidity and insulation make the drywall droop over time. Popcorn helps to hide it some but after it gets so bad .....

The biggest issue with dropping [replacing] the ceiling is the mess
 
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Old 12-09-11, 07:01 AM
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Since I'm not familiar how "building" a house works, I'm assuming I have drywall nailed to rafters in the attic. On top of the drywall in the attic is the insulation mess?

I wish I could get up into my attic; the opening is made for a twig and unfortunately I'm not a twig and neither is my wife! lol!
 
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Old 12-09-11, 07:47 AM
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Ugh. I never even thought about insulation.

This could be a nightmare.
 
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Old 12-09-11, 08:44 AM
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bahahaha... All I can do is laugh at the situation. :P

Could I technically leave it alone or will it eventually break and fall?
 
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Old 12-09-11, 09:11 AM
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Eventually break and fall? Yes but could be many, many years.

It's worth considering that you leave this alone until/unless it does break and only deal with it then.
 
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Old 12-09-11, 10:09 AM
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I'm not familiar how "building" a house works
The drywall is either nailed or screwed to the rafters. Most builders use blown cellulose insulation because it's the most economical way to get the attic [ceiling] insulated. Batt insulation is also a possiblity or even a mixture of the two if the insulation has been upgraded since the house was built.

I bet if you measure the distance on the ceiling where the drywall isn't sagging - it will be 24"

If your camera has a good flash, you might be able to just stick it thru the attic access and take a pic or two for you to view. What are the dimensions of the attic access? Generally they are cut to fit in between the rafters. If the access hole is about 23" square, that would indicate rafters on 24" centers
 
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