Bike rack mount FAIL

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  #1  
Old 12-17-11, 02:46 PM
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Bike rack mount FAIL

Trying to mount a bike rack to a wall. After having threaded anchors rip out of the drywall once the bike was placed on the rack, and after some advice from this forum, I opted to find and mount into a stud.

Stud located, and I used 5/32" drill bit to make the pilot holes for 1/4" wood screws. Drove screws most of the way in with drill/driver, and when that got stuck, I switched to an impact driver. Drove screws home, but one of the screws snapped in half.

Should I have not used an impact driver on wood screws? I guess that means I should have made larger pilot holes? 11/64"? 12/64"?

How far away should the new holes be from the old holes so that the hold is not compromised by the old holes in the stud? I assume there is no easy way to re-use the hole that has half a screw embedded in it, and that it's easier to move the rack slightly.
 

Last edited by cartman; 12-17-11 at 03:08 PM.
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Old 12-17-11, 03:23 PM
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Yea, I'm afraid you need to move the rack. Moving an inch higher or lower should be enough and hopefully the rack will cover the old hole.

Your pilot drill size should have been fine if you drilled to the full depth of the screw length. Unfortunately there are a lot of cheap screws on the market these days. I've seen screws snap long before they should have. A lot of it is experience but when tightening if you think it's taking too much torque you're probably right and using a hand wrench or ratchet makes it much easier to tell than when using an impact driver. One trick if you are running the screw in and it seems to be getting too hard. Stop and back out the screw. Coat it with soap, wax, grease, petroleum jelly or oil and try screwing it in again.
 
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Old 12-17-11, 03:39 PM
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Not sure what type of screw you are using but I've had drywall screws snap before..... and they aren't the best choice for this application. Lubricating the screw does work although I usually back it off a little and try again a time or two before I go thru the trouble of getting a lubricant.
Way back when, carpenters used to run a screw or nail thru their hair when it needed lubrication...... but hair styles have changed
 
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Old 12-17-11, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Pilot Dane View Post
Yea, I'm afraid you need to move the rack. Moving an inch higher or lower should be enough and hopefully the rack will cover the old hole.

Your pilot drill size should have been fine if you drilled to the full depth of the screw length. Unfortunately there are a lot of cheap screws on the market these days. I've seen screws snap long before they should have. A lot of it is experience but when tightening if you think it's taking too much torque you're probably right and using a hand wrench or ratchet makes it much easier to tell than when using an impact driver. One trick if you are running the screw in and it seems to be getting too hard. Stop and back out the screw. Coat it with soap, wax, grease, petroleum jelly or oil and try screwing it in again.
Yeah, I'll just use the drill this time, which at least gives some torque feedback, and will try a little grease on the screw.

Would using 3/16 drill bit (the next larger size I have) be too large for a 1/4" wood screw?
 
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Old 12-17-11, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Not sure what type of screw you are using but I've had drywall screws snap before..... and they aren't the best choice for this application.
I'm using 1/4" x 2" wood screws.
 
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Old 12-18-11, 06:05 AM
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Those should be fine, I just wanted to make sure you were using the correct screw for the job

Like PD said, I think your drill bit size should be ok as long as you drill it deep enough.
 
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Old 12-18-11, 08:28 AM
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Assuming this is a flat metal plate you are putting on the wall you do not want to use wood screws because the upper one third is not threaded. You want to use either flat head or pan head sheet metal screws. They have threads all the way. I'd probably use lag screws.
 
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Old 12-18-11, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Assuming this is a flat metal plate you are putting on the wall you do not want to use wood screws because the upper one third is not threaded. You want to use either flat head or pan head sheet metal screws. They have threads all the way. I'd probably use lag screws.
That upper one third is the part that is sitting in drywall, so does it matter?
 
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Old 12-18-11, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by cartman View Post
That upper one third is the part that is sitting in drywall, so does it matter?
Maybe not in this case, just quoting standard practice. Personally as I said I'd use lag screws. You could paint them to match the rack before installing. Washer head hex screws would be another choice.
 
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Old 12-18-11, 04:18 PM
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Thanks for the tips guys. Used the same drill bit (5/32"), but put some grease on the screw threads. Drill ran them right in.
 
 

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