Hairline cracks in new drywall


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Old 03-01-12, 04:32 AM
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Hairline cracks in new drywall

I just finished taping the drywall in a 12X25 room over our garage. For decades I have always used paper tape for my drywall projects and never had a problem. But on this project I thought it would save time to use the mesh tape. I just finished sanding and now I am getting hairline cracks on many of the seams. I thought this stuff was SUPPOSED to be a newer better way to tape joints but this is bad.

Any ideas on what I can do to remedy this problem? I seriously do not want to start ripping out the mesh tape and starting over.

Thanks
 
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Old 03-01-12, 04:50 AM
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Wish you had asked before using the 'sticky' tape. It has a poor track record

Generally when using 'sticky' tape it's best to cover it with a setting compound. Setting compounds dry harder than ready mix j/c and helps to prevent a lot of the issues with sticky tape. Normally a couple coats of hot mud will be used over the sticky tape with the final coat being regular mud [it sands a lot easier] I don't know how effective hot mud will be at this point but it would certainly be worth a try.
 
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Old 03-01-12, 06:16 AM
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Thanks Mark. I wish I had asked too Would it help to lay down paper tape at this point? I mean over the top?
 
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Old 03-01-12, 06:31 AM
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Been doing more research. Although you can't tell, I am sobing now. It appears that the only way to fix this is to rip out the mesh and start over. Say it isn't so...
 
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Old 03-01-12, 07:09 AM
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Yeah, the paper is better and I think you need to start over. If you had put a setting type compound over the mesh you may have been ok but given that you're going to have to go back, I'd get paper this time.
 
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Old 03-01-12, 07:17 AM
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Thanks mitch (I guess... LOL) So how does one "start over?" Do I need to grind all of the joint compound off down to the bare drywall? Sounds like it would be easier to just rip everything out and hang new sheetrock! Can this be repaired? What steps should I take?

Thanks
 
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Old 03-01-12, 07:47 AM
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No, don't rip out the rock itself. You should be able to dig out the mesh tape and put the paper in its place, joint compound does not get all that hard.

If you happen to damage the drywall paper anywhere and expose the gypsum, cover that with Zinnser Gardz primer and then you can put joint comound over that.
 
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Old 03-01-12, 08:13 AM
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Any suggestions on technique? I just went out and tried a test seam. It is a very slow process. The mesh is pretty well embedded in the joint compound so it comes out in strands. Super course sandpaper maybe? Do I need to take it down to bare drywall and remove the mesh entirely? Or can I scrape down a channel and lay paper tape over the top?
 

Last edited by mwarney; 03-01-12 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 03-01-12, 09:38 AM
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Regular joint compound is water soluble so using a wet sponge might help.

While paper tape over the existing might work - you'd probably need to skim coat all the drywall to make the joint disappear.
 
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Old 03-01-12, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Regular joint compound is water soluble so using a wet sponge might help.

While paper tape over the existing might work - you'd probably need to skim coat all the drywall to make the joint disappear.
If I used a sanding block to wear down a channel, then laid a strip of paper tape (without actually removing the mesh), do you think that would hold? I know I will need to skim over the seams again to blend it in but it might be easier than cheseling down to bare drywall and "picking" out strands of mesh.
 
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Old 03-01-12, 10:00 AM
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As long as the 'sticky' tape doesn't come unglued from the drywall that should work fine.
 
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Old 03-01-12, 11:45 AM
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First of all, are you certain that the studs/joists that your drywall is secured to, are solid ? Secondly, have you used enough fasteners (nails, screws) ? For the price of a few extra dozen, it's worth it in the long run. Thirdly, Are you certain that the fasteners are installed properly ? To place a screw or nail too deeply is like not having one at all. Particularly screws. They must press on the paper of the drywall and countersink - no more ! If you rip the drywall paper by placing the screw too deep, simply place another next to it. If the board "pops", it may not be placed correctly (flat) on the studs. If you have not painted yet, I would strongly advise doing that now. I have analyzed and studied the pros and cons regarding paper tape vs. fiberglass (mesh) tape. Without getting into my overall conclusions I'll just say that they are about equal. It's nice that one could apply the mesh without need for mud, as with paper. You'll still need three coats of mud, period. During the 1st and 2nd coats is when you "want" it to crack if it's going to, so that your 3rd coat fills it. I've seen many who sand between coats. I think this is not needed since merely scraping it down will suffice to prepare it for the next coat. Besides - sanding will make the surface more smooth, which you don't want before another coat. (Each step in the operation should make the next step easier) I seldom water down my joint compound when taping. To me it's enough that handling the material makes it more workable. If you must add water for workability, I suggest not much more than a cup to a five gallon bucket. I also advice against wet sanding (sponge) because it gives uneven pressure removing mud. Unless you're useing a float. You shouldn't have to rip out any of the mesh tape so long as it's not bubbling, which goes back to the beginning... lay out the mesh tape FLAT !
 
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Old 03-01-12, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Whmy View Post
First of all, are you certain that the studs/joists that your drywall is secured to, are solid ? Secondly, have you used enough fasteners (nails, screws) ? For the price of a few extra dozen, it's worth it in the long run. Thirdly, Are you certain that the fasteners are installed properly ? To place a screw or nail too deeply is like not having one at all. Particularly screws. They must press on the paper of the drywall and countersink - no more ! If you rip the drywall paper by placing the screw too deep, simply place another next to it. If the board "pops", it may not be placed correctly (flat) on the studs. If you have not painted yet, I would strongly advise doing that now. I have analyzed and studied the pros and cons regarding paper tape vs. fiberglass (mesh) tape. Without getting into my overall conclusions I'll just say that they are about equal. It's nice that one could apply the mesh without need for mud, as with paper. You'll still need three coats of mud, period. During the 1st and 2nd coats is when you "want" it to crack if it's going to, so that your 3rd coat fills it. I've seen many who sand between coats. I think this is not needed since merely scraping it down will suffice to prepare it for the next coat. Besides - sanding will make the surface more smooth, which you don't want before another coat. (Each step in the operation should make the next step easier) I seldom water down my joint compound when taping. To me it's enough that handling the material makes it more workable. If you must add water for workability, I suggest not much more than a cup to a five gallon bucket. I also advice against wet sanding (sponge) because it gives uneven pressure removing mud. Unless you're useing a float. You shouldn't have to rip out any of the mesh tape so long as it's not bubbling, which goes back to the beginning... lay out the mesh tape FLAT !
Thanks... I think the drywall is good. The walls are 24 O.C. but I have strapping on the ceiling. I already have three coats of mud on the joints that are cracked. I have a roll of super thin 2 1/2" wide mesh that I bought a while back for repairing surface cracks in our old house. I'm wondering if I should try using this with a fourth skim coat over the cracked seams??
 
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Old 03-01-12, 12:15 PM
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If you're considering a 4th coat - A) don't be ashamed B) now is the time ! The width of the tape is somewhat mute since most of it lays on the board. Y'r walls are 24" OC huh ? If a truck or bus drives by they'll probably vibrate, and if they vibrate - they be a movin' ! I'll pray for you
 
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Old 03-01-12, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Whmy View Post
If you're considering a 4th coat - A) don't be ashamed B) now is the time ! The width of the tape is somewhat mute since most of it lays on the board. Y'r walls are 24" OC huh ? If a truck or bus drives by they'll probably vibrate, and if they vibrate - they be a movin' ! I'll pray for you
I guess 24 O.C. because it is a garage and the builder thought that was sufficient. No trucks coming by unless they come through the woods

Ever heard of this stuff? STRESS CRACK TAPE 50 Joint and Crack Repair - Drywall, Plaster, Gypsum, & sheetrock repair patches for Ceilings and Walls.
 
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Old 03-01-12, 02:38 PM
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We had someone else ask about the stress crack tape a while back but no one had used it and the person asking never responded back with any results.

If you try it, please let us know how it works.
 
 

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