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Covering slump block walls with sheetrock

Covering slump block walls with sheetrock


  #1  
Old 05-13-12, 05:11 PM
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Covering slump block walls with sheetrock

I have slump block walls exposed on the interior of my house. I would like to cover them with sheetrock. My rooms are small so I would like to take up as little space as possible. I know I could fir out the walls and then sheetrock but is there an alternative that would take up less of the interior space? I have heard of adhering the sheetrock directly to the slump block with adhesive but I am skeptical of getting the walls level and have concerns if the adhesive does not bond correctly and the sheetrock shifts and end up with cracks and endless repairs. I have also heard of attaching lathe to the slump block and then applying plaster to get a smooth finish. Has anyone used either of these methods with long term success?
 
  #2  
Old 05-14-12, 04:09 AM
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Masonry can retain moisture so it's never a good idea to install drywall directly to masonry. Common practice is to build a 2x wall that is kicked out slightly from the masonry wall. Above grade it's ok to use furring strips.

In the early 70's I rented a block house that had the inside of the block covered with either plaster or stucco. While it looked decent, it was a very noisy house. There were too many hard materials and not enough soft materials to help absorb the sound. That house was built in the 50's - in fla.
 
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Old 05-14-12, 10:43 AM
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I am in Arizona, very dry. The slump block is painted and displays no sign of moisture issues anywhere. Just trying to figure a way not to make small rooms smaller.
 
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Old 05-14-12, 11:07 AM
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maurice -

you are right about he moisture. Unfortunately, people in other areas put products/things in a material category without regard to the climate. That is why you appreciate the "dry heat" inside the house with lower costs for AC and dehumidification than frame structure.

Slump block have been used for decades in AZ. They are manufactured product that has a a designed "bulge" to the side within a limit while maintaining a constant height and are made in automated plants.

The problem with stripping the walls is that they are designed to have irregularities and I would suggest the thinnest (3/4") stripping you can use and use short screws for the drywall. It has been done that way in your area for years to blend the traditional look with smooth finished walls. Beware - slump block can be very dense and tough to drill into. No one will notice the slight wall thickness change and loss of area.
 
 

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