drywall screw setting tool

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Old 09-20-12, 12:01 AM
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drywall screw setting tool

Hello and I see this has been worked over here, but threads are old. I'm fixin to hang 50 sheets of 5/8' on the ceiling and will be doing at my own pace. I did purchase a lift. I want to just use my dewalt cordless drill and want a reliable, dependable screw setting adoptor. I've read the review on the bosch dimpler, and is average at best. I really don't want another electric tool laying around after this job is done, uh, but I also don't want the frustration of some half assed tool that don't work correctly. wither. I'm open to suggestions. If it needs to be another electric tool, then so be it. Thx, DM
 
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Old 09-20-12, 02:57 AM
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Dimpling tools are great, if you can find one you like. As you have seen, some are mediocre at best. I hate to say it, but if you can find a deal on an impact driver, it will be money well spent, especially since you are tackling 50 sheets of rock.
Orange has the Ridgid combo pack on for about $179, I believe, and it is a quality driver. The reason I mention impact is you can set sheetrock screws with precision, not having an over driven effect, and they stop on a dime. I have worked in commercial jobsites, and that's all those guys use. Yeah, they make noise, but you will throw away your other drill once you use an impact, believe me.
NOW, the impact will be universally adaptable for a lot of uses, but you can buy a dedicated sheetrock dimpling drill for probably $70. Now you have a sheetrock dimpler in a drawer when you are through. I have 3 of them on my jobsite trailer, and they NEVER get used. Guys prefer the impact driver.....no cord, lightweight, accurate.
 
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Old 09-20-12, 04:18 AM
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dewalt

Larry, my Dewalt cordless drill is a ratcheting driver. I also found a local person with a dewalt drywall gun for $20. I may get this and keep within my budget. Thx, DM
 

Last edited by drmax; 09-20-12 at 05:40 AM.
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Old 09-20-12, 07:04 AM
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Hi DM,

I did 200 sheets of 4 x 12 - 5/8" with a 16' ceiling, mostly by myself. And I was 60 and out of shape. Out of shape improved, they are heavy. But it takes some innovation and once you apply a few tricks, it really isn't that bad.

I purchased two "Senco" strip screw guns, one battery and the other powered, I preferred the powered. Screws are expensive, but they operate one handed and you will have a lot to do with that other hand. If you purchase a tool specific for this job, you can always sell it after. But if you end up like me, a lot more jobs will pop up and you will look like a pro. I had a pro get me started so that helped, but 50 sheets will be a good start.

Taping is the real challenge, but hanging the rock can make that job harder or easier. The pros here are very good, so ask for all of the tricks they will share. Tools like a rasp to clean up a cut edge or removing the fuzzy edge to make room for some mud are simple and they help. Ceiling first, with the wall piece pushed up tight. If you have trusses, no screws in the corners on the ceiling.

There's more, just keep asking
Bud
 
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Old 09-20-12, 12:17 PM
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I bought a drywall lift. I'm just gonna go it with my dewalt drill and adoptor for now. Thx
 
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Old 09-20-12, 03:31 PM
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Not a bad price for the sheetrock screwgun. It will dimple like you want it to. And it beats $179 for the kit.
 
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Old 09-20-12, 04:36 PM
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For a DIYer a drywall screwgun is not worth the time or money. It takes a little while to get used to the gun and by the time you get the hang of it your done.

This is what you want for your cordless: Drywall Screw Setter - DW2014 You can pick them up at any hardware store, lumber yard, or home center. Lots of different brands out there and they all work well. Get a magnetic screw tip adapter for your cordless and you will be good to go. It will also help hold the screws to drive them in.

$1.31 beats $20 and $179
 
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Old 09-20-12, 07:53 PM
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screw spacing

My joists are 24". I'm getting mixed reviews of the screw spacing....anywhere from 12", to 12" and then double screw. Please, give me the skinny on this. I'm pretty sure the length is 1 1/4". Thank you. DM
 
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Old 09-20-12, 08:29 PM
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I would go with 1-1/2" screws. !-1/4" only gives you 5/8" into the wood, and I like to have 3/4" or better, especially on a ceiling.

BTW, all I've ever used on my DeWalt cordless is an adapter
 
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Old 09-20-12, 08:48 PM
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what about the number of screws? 12" from edge to edge, is 25 screw per 4x8 sheet.
also, would you use adhesive?
thx, dm
 
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Old 09-21-12, 01:19 AM
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I double screw about 4" apart the two edge screws, then field screw every 12". Adhesive is a plus in any installation, especially with a 24" spacing. I also use 1 5/8" course thread screws.
 
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Old 09-21-12, 04:07 AM
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I moved your last post to a holding corral since posting an email address in the forum is opening yourself to spammers. Your question was how do you screw to the edge of the sheetrock. Your sheetrock in a utopic fashion will overlap your joists by 3/4" which is adequate space to screw it up. First screw about an inch from the edge then the next one about 3 or 4" from that. Jump to 12" or so and end off with the same pattern you started with. The edge is the weakest part and will have more pull than the body will, thus the double screwing. If you run into a situation where you don't have the half joist to screw to, you can always install a "sister" to the offending joist to give you more screwing location. If you want, and have the time, you can do it all through your installation before you start, to ensure you have adequate surface.
 
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Old 09-21-12, 06:22 AM
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When you say "overlap by3/4" " it's sounds like you're telling me not to have the butt of the drywall on the center of the stud. Really confused on that part. I'll get directions from the place I'm buying it from. Would you use adhesive for extra strength? If so, this will be an additional $200 for enough PL-100. If screwing is enough, that I'm not gonna screw around with mastic. Greg
 
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Old 09-21-12, 07:17 AM
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When you say "overlap by3/4" " it's sounds like you're telling me not to have the butt of the drywall on the center of the stud. Really confused on that part.
What if, instead of saying
Originally Posted by chandler
Your sheetrock in a utopic fashion will overlap your joists by 3/4",
Chandler had said
Your sheetrock in a utopic fashion will [lap onto] your joists by 3/4"?
Same thing.
 
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Old 09-21-12, 11:09 AM
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What happens if i say...."I don't know what utopic fashion is"....and when I google this, it doesn't relate to this conversation. This is either a drywallers terminology, or I too thick to understand.
 
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Old 09-21-12, 11:24 AM
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Utopia......all things work perfectly and life is good. Think "perfect world".....Larry just got all high falutin there for a bit....
 
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Old 10-18-12, 06:32 PM
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fiberglass vs tape

Gosh fella's (ladies) I finally got my 50 sheets up, and with the use of a bought $150 troy lift. I could not have done this as quickly without it. So I got my joint compound (green top) and paper tape. I've read and read, and also asked 1st hand experienced people, and I'm pretty sure I'm stopping at Menards in the morning and trading in the paper for the self sticking mesh. Stop me in my tracks, if I'm wrong...but with all the talk going either way, then why the heck wold I want to put myself through more hell, and "try" to use the paper? I'm sure I'll get a battery of responses, but if I get just one that says, "the mesh will be fine", then I'm doing it. I will say, that this is the only layer of mud I'm putting on...and this is to keep the blown insul. from leaking down through. I never plan to finish the ceiling...again, just one pass with the mud and I'm done.
Please advise and thank you....DM
 
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Old 10-18-12, 06:50 PM
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They both serve the same purpose. I think it's just a matter of personal preferance. I've used both and still use the mesh on cracked plaster repairs but have gone back to paper for drywall. If you want to be done with it, use the mesh and slap on a heavy coat of mud.
 
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Old 10-18-12, 08:04 PM
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CHEERS! It's decided!!
 
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Old 10-19-12, 04:33 AM
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I wouldn't use the sticky mesh tape! It has a poor track record especially when used with regular joint compound. If you use the sticky tape, you need to cover it with a setting compound like durabond. I'd use the paper tape along with the green lid j/c. You also need to use paper tape for the inside corners - doubt you could fold mesh tape down the middle

Normally it takes 3 coats of mud to finish drywall. Each coat will be a little wider than the previous one. If applied halfway decent the 3rd coat is the only one that needs to be sanded.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 03:05 PM
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I see that even after applying, what I thought was a heavy coat...I will still need to go back and will in the shrinkage seam. So I suppose paper tape would not have let this happen? Dunno, but too late. I'll slather another coat over this tomorrow after it dries up some.
"edit"
Or now that I think of it...maybe I don't need to fill in this seam area? There is no exposure to what will be the insullation, and that was all I was trying to accomplish.

Do I need to level this edge seam with mud? Thx for the advise....DM
 

Last edited by drmax; 10-20-12 at 03:10 PM. Reason: added info
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Old 10-20-12, 03:10 PM
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Less is more with this stuff...easier to add some than to sand too much down.

In the few repairs I've done, I've used both paper and mesh. Paper seems easier to cover for painting, but mesh seems easier to apply...esp if you aren't too concerned with the finish. I've used mesh for repairs in the garage or under a sink..where I don't care about looks...and it worked fine.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 03:11 PM
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hey Gunguy...i added another line to my last post. Please chime in on that. Thank you
 
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Old 10-20-12, 03:50 PM
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drmax,
My first large drywall job was when I renovated my upstairs, 3 bedrooms, a bath and a large hallway. I put up 80 sheets mostly by myself. I used that fine blue mesh sticky tape because it was so much easier than that old fashioned paper tape.

Within a couple of years nearly every joint had cracked. Over a period of several years I redid all of those joints with paper tape. That was 20+ years ago but unless something has changed in the DW tape world I wouldn't recommend using mesh.Mesh might be OK for small patches and repairs but paper is best for most joints.

BTW - You might want to think twice about slathering heavy coats when it comes to joint compound. Light coats dry faster and require less sanding.
 
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Old 10-21-12, 04:09 AM
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now that I think of it...maybe I don't need to fill in this seam area? There is no exposure to what will be the insullation, and that was all I was trying to accomplish.
I'm a little confused Is the drywall supposed to be a finished wall or just a covering for the insulation? If it's just a covering - mud/tape the joints and one coat of mud over the screw/nails is all that is needed. If the drywall is to be painted [or even wallpaper] you need to get the finish job right. Texture will hide minor imperfections but isn't a substitute for drywall finishing. And Wayne is right - it's easier to add an extra coat of mud than sand off the excess!

Mesh tape does ok if it's covered with a setting compound like durabond and I've heard it does alright if you spray on an additional adhesive first BUT I've found it's best to use paper tape and have no worries
 
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