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Mounting pull up bar between ceiling joists?

Mounting pull up bar between ceiling joists?

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Old 05-06-13, 08:25 PM
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Mounting pull up bar between ceiling joists?

Hello,

I purchased a ceiling mounted pull up bar (Ceiling Mounted Pull Up Bar) to install in my garage. The plans are pretty straight forward. It has two bolts on either mount that go into a ceiling joist.

However, I'd like to turn it 90 degrees so that it fits better in my garage layout, but I'm unsure how to make it strong enough as not all the bolts would go into joists then. Can I buy some 2x lumber and simply screw it in between the ceiling joists and then screw the pull up bar to it?

The garage does have dry wall on the ceiling, but I have good attic access.

What would be a good way of mounting it securely at the 90 degree angle?

Thanks for your help!

Sincerely,
Stephen
 
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Old 05-06-13, 09:07 PM
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You can do that.
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Old 05-07-13, 12:04 PM
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Thanks! I'll give it a try.
 
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Old 05-07-13, 12:16 PM
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I would use joist hangers! Just screwing 2x to the joist is not very strong without support.

And do you have joists or engineered trusses?
 
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Old 05-07-13, 04:05 PM
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GunGuy,

Thanks for the tip. Joist hangers look better than screws. =)

Pardon the ignorance, but what is the difference between joists and engineered trusses? My house (with attached garage) was built in 1983, if that helps. It is attic space directly above the garage, so the joists are connected to the roof supports as well.

--Stephen
 
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Old 05-07-13, 04:38 PM
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Trusses are normally made of 2x4 with nailing plates at joints. They are made in a geometric style. Do a Google image search for wood trusses and you'll see what I mean.

Rafters and joists is a different, older style of construction normally using larger members like 2x6 and 2x8. Similar search will show examples.

Use the special screws on the joist hangers. (I'm pretty sure they are available?) Trying to pound nails in will cause issues with nail pops and such in the garage below unless you are using a pneumatic nailer.
 
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Old 05-08-13, 12:47 PM
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I have the trusses (was up in the attic yesterday to look) made with 2x4s.

I'll give the joist hangers a try.

Thanks for your help, Gun Guy!

--Stephen
 
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Old 05-08-13, 01:20 PM
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You want to spread the load as much as possible with trusses. Unless specifically designed for a load on the bottom chord(?)...they are not meant to support weight from above or load from below. Basically they are engineered to distribute the load of the roof and roofing materials to the supporting walls.

If you want to avoid problems...think about building a "box" around the attachment area to help transfer load. I know it's in the garage, and I doubt it would be a structural problem, but nail pops and loosening of the sheetrock could happen if you use the bars a lot.

The box is basically supporting members outside the load area (using hangers or screwed/nailed to surrounding joists) to spread the load to adjacent trusses.

I know...sounds like overkill...but relatively simple to do. A few more cut lengths of 2x4 some predrilling and 3 1/2" deck screws.
 
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Old 05-08-13, 06:32 PM
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How much weight are we talking about? There is no reason he can't turn the bar 90 degrees w/o rebuilding the house.
 
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Old 05-12-13, 03:16 PM
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Hi Y'all,

So I went ahead with the joist hangers and I have the pull up bar suspended from the ceiling now. For regular pull ups, it works just fine (the ceiling moves, but only a little bit). However, for "kipping" pull ups, which are particularly energetic, the ceiling bounces what looks like an inch or more.

Needless to say, we won't be doing kipping pull ups. I went in the attic and watched while my roommate did kipping pull ups as the joists did move as a unit.

I'm assuming this is a side effect of old construction (used 2x4s and not something heavy duty) and a long distance between the walls (two car garage).

Any thoughts on how to fix it or what the dangers of these movements in the ceiling joists are?

Thanks for all your help!

Sincerely,
Stephen
 
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Old 05-12-13, 04:12 PM
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Posts on either side of the bar would be the ideal answer but I don't know how that would work with you cars. The second answer would be to install 2x4s between the joists & the rafters. If you can't do either of those things, wear a hard hat.
 
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