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Distressed Home with Obliterated Drywalls

Distressed Home with Obliterated Drywalls


  #1  
Old 11-11-13, 04:01 PM
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Distressed Home with Obliterated Drywalls

Hello Folks,
I have distressed house whose interior drywall was mostly obliterated. So I was wondering if I should simply buy new drywall of the same thickness (1/2) and grade and then cut it square and patch it, or maybe just remove the remains of the old drywall and install the whole thing anew.

Also the previous owner managed to make a see through hole perforating not only the drywall but also the exterior wall sheathing albeit the hole is not visible from the exterior wall because of the siding. I am assuming the sheathing should be osb3 or plywood. What would be the approach to patch or repair that?

Below are some pics that speak for themselves:


Drywall Destruction



Light pass through wall
 
  #2  
Old 11-11-13, 08:01 PM
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Yes, I'd say you should probably plan on replacing a lot of that drywall. It doesn't pay to repair a lot of holes if they are all over. Don't cut out more than you have to... but yes, square things off and try to catch the majority of the damage with new drywall. There may be some places where you will want to leave the existing drywall... like at an inside corner... or close to a ceiling... so that you don't have to tape and float both sides of the corner. It saves you a little work. But by doing that, you may have to add a little framing.

So let's take the kitchen sink photo, for example. You may not want to rip out the drywall clear to the inside corner. But if you cut the drywall where the damage ends... there's no stud there! Well, just put a couple pieces of 2x4 in horizontally at top and bottom, and maybe one vertically in-between them so that you have something right behind the seam where the new drywall will meet the old drywall. Use screws to fasten all of this to the existing framing and to the old drywall.
 
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Old 11-12-13, 03:30 AM
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Wow! Like X, I'd square up the damage and replace sections - that should be quicker and be easier to finish. It looks like they intended to install a window in the bottom pic. If you decide not to install a window you'll need to add studs, insulation and vapor barrier before you hang drywall.

While you have the damaged drywall removed is a good time to evaluate the insulation and electrical - never a better time to add/move elec devices where you want/need them.
 
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Old 11-12-13, 05:32 AM
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XSleeper: thanks for the insights! I wonder why some still use nail, given that self tapping screws seem easier, stronger, and less cumbersome. Is there a particular size of screw for different drywall thickness? I am planning on install a drywall of the same thickness of the ones current installed for uniformity

marksr: thanks for the input! I believe there was a windows there before, but the previous owner went in a destruction spree with a sledgehammer destroying everything. Yep, I am planning on change and add lots of things (cat6 Ethernet cable throughout, light fixtures, check all electrical conduits and parts).

First I will cover any see through hole (some holes allow the passage of light), but I can not see the holes from the outside given that they may be covered by the vinyl sidings. So I may have to patch the plywood of osb sheathing as well.

Last but not least, the house is missing fascia cover, soffits, and gutters. I am planning on tackling that sooner too given that it is all exposed now.


(No soffits, fascia, or gutters present)


(house from the outset)



How bad is the prospect of recovery? Any insights are greatly appreciated!
 
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Old 11-12-13, 08:20 AM
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Nails are quicker/cheaper than screws BUT screws do a better job. Nail pops are fairly common but it's rare to see a screw pop. I normally use nails on the perimeter of larger sheets of drywall so I can tack it up in short order but prefer to use screws on the rest of it.

How bad is the prospect of recovery? Any insights are greatly appreciated!
We would assume you got the house at a reduced priced which makes the repairs cost effective. The more sweat equity you can provide, the better your bank balance will look. There is always a member or two that have done whatever project is at hand so don't be afraid to ask. The experience and bragging rites you accumulate along the way - priceless
 
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Old 11-12-13, 08:40 AM
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What's your plans for this house?
What's the roof like? If it's bad work on that first!
That outside would look 100% better with vinyl siding.
 
  #7  
Old 11-12-13, 09:46 AM
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With reference to screws: use sharp pointed coarse thread screws into wood studs. Self - tapping are for screwing into heavy guage steel studs. Fine thread sharp points are for screwing into light gauge steel framing.

for 1/2 rock use 1 1/4 " screws. For 5/8 Rock use 1 1/2 or 1 5/8 screws.

I concur with the other posters the more new work you do the better it will be and in the long run the easier. Also if you can handle it when you redo a wall the longer the sheet the better for you will have fewer joints to tape.

The picture of the outside of the house with the deck looks like the roof sags a little at the eave over the deck. It could be an optical illusion.

The outside would look 101% better with stucco.
 
  #8  
Old 11-14-13, 12:47 PM
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I have condo in MI, so I have a place to live in the mean time. But gradually the plan was to fix up everything and then move in. I made an offer of US$18000, and it was accepted. I am mechanically inclined and have all tool and means to fix such things, but I certainly would undergo a learning process and experience. Besides I would cater the house to fit my own preferences and needs (floor, electrical, etc); so I could see lots of benefits.

Closing was scheduled for 11/13/2013 (yesterday). The day before around at 9pm I received via email a copy of the HUD and instructions on how to wire the money. The place whereon the closing would take place is about 3 hours from my residence, and the house I was about to buy is about 2:30 hours. Once I received the HUD up front I detected errors (such as the amount I paid in earnest money), but the most outrageous thing (which I then assumed could not possibly be true were the property taxes, especially if you consider that Indiana has a very low property taxes overall compared to other States). It was clearly stated since the very first beginning that the property taxes for the property were US$917 p/ calendar year which actually is high for that area (you easily find home whose taxes are less $300), but since it was a 1 acre home I accepted the higher amount. Nonetheless on the HUD it was showing an outrageous amount of $4500, so I assumed it was another error; but it turned out that it was not. The buyers agent blamed the listing agent and the bank for providing the wrong information, and ultimately the deal feel through. Lots of distress and waste of time, but maybe it was better that way.

Thanks a lot for all of you who chimed!
 
 

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