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Painting over stipple ceiling for first time

Painting over stipple ceiling for first time


  #1  
Old 05-06-14, 07:42 PM
J
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Painting over stipple ceiling for first time

I am painting over a stipple ceiling that has never been painted. The consenus I have heard from painters and paint stores is that an oil based ceiling paint MUST be used if the stipple has never before been painted.

Since this is my own house and I live in it with my family, I am concerned about fumes.

Is there an oil ceiling paint with lower fumes I can use? Can anyone recommend anything?

I have about 1000 sq ft of ceiling to paint and I am not sure if that will be harmful to my family.

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 05-07-14, 04:09 AM
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While I'm not sure what your definition of a stipple texture is, most textures consist of joint compound which is water soluble. When unpainted texture gets old it doesn't take much moisture for it to turn loose from the drywall, especially in baths, kitchens and anywhere the ceiling is exposed to humidity [including open windows]

Your safest bet is to use an oil base primer! Some primers have a low odor formula [stated on label] Opening the windows and having good ventilation should remove the majority of the fumes in short order. For the most part, the fumes aren't harmful although some are affected more than others. I suffer from occupational over exposure to solvents [lifetime of using solvent based coatings] and have to wear a respirator if I apply much oil base.

Sometimes you can get by with applying latex directly to the unpainted texture. Spraying is almost fool proof but there is a LOT of prep involved to spray in an occupied home. When rolling, you have to be quick and not spend too much time in any one spot. Missed areas must be allowed to dry before going back over them. Again, an oil base primer is the safest way to go!
 
  #3  
Old 05-07-14, 08:25 AM
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thanks for the tip. That's exactly what I've been hearing from other painters.

Can you recommend a specific brand of oil based primer with low odor?

Thanks!
 
  #4  
Old 05-07-14, 11:57 AM
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Most brands have a low odor formula [it's stated on the label] I know SWP has some and I think Kilz has a low odor oil primer. Look/ask where you buy your paint - they should have some available.
 
  #5  
Old 05-07-14, 12:36 PM
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Any comments on this Kilz product?: KILZ MAX

It's water based that "performs like oil".

Sounds kind of like this hybrid stain phenomenon.

Would this work with my application? Or is it being water based still an issue?

Thanks again!
 
  #6  
Old 05-07-14, 01:23 PM
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I like a lot of waterborne coatings but I've never applied any directly to unsealed gypsum so I don't know how it would behave. I'd be leery until it was proven to me that the water in waterborne wouldn't dissolve the texture. I'd feel safer using a tried and true oil base primer.
 
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Old 05-07-14, 01:30 PM
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Many thanks!

What would you say is an acceptable VOC level in the oil based primers? (the "odourless" primers seem to be around 350)

Again, I just want to make sure this is all safe for my family to actually live in the house while I am painting the ceiling.

Thanks again!
 
  #8  
Old 05-07-14, 01:36 PM
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I've never paid a lot of attention to the VOC levels of the different lines of paint I think lower VOC levels equate to less odor but don't know that for sure. Unless anyone in your house has asthma or otherwise affected by paint odors, I wouldn't stress out about it. If you can open the windows [especially after you are done] maybe install a fan or two to help exhaust the fumes - it should clear out fairly quick.
 
  #9  
Old 05-07-14, 04:24 PM
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I'd go with an oil primer over a latex claiming to act like oil. Original oil based Kilz is a good primer but I've never seen a reason to use any of their other products.
 
 

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