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How long can drywall paste joint compound sit before priming?

How long can drywall paste joint compound sit before priming?

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  #1  
Old 06-28-14, 03:05 PM
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How long can drywall paste joint compound sit before priming?

I'm patching 11 holes in my ceiling in one room today but need to get some 220 grit for my orbital sander and don't feel like driving to get it. The holes were old recessed lighting holes. I would like to put at least one application of paste on each hole today, but finish it next week. I'm rushing it because the draft through the cracks is draining my ac unit in this heat. Is there any reason I can't do that? I know humidity damages unpainted dw compound but can it hang unprotected for a week or two?
 
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Old 06-28-14, 03:14 PM
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Doesn't matter if you put one coat now and one next week, though you may want to wipe off any dust that may have accumulated.

How big are the holes? Compound (not paste, that's for wallpaper) has to be supported and shouldn't be used by itself for holes bigger than about 1/2" max.
 
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Old 06-28-14, 04:53 PM
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thx I'm using dry wall for patch with 2 x 4 support underneath attached to the joists. holes are 6" and 4".
 
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Old 06-28-14, 05:13 PM
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No problem then. Screw the new stuff to the support, tape the gap, apply compound. sand as needed.

Plenty of garages are rough taped and finished years later.

Just a tip, a hole saw sized to your patches may make things easier. Use them to cut your patches.

Alternatively...you can cut the patch leaving the paper on one side and use that instead of tape. Matter of fact it's called a California patch. More difficult with a round hole.
 
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Old 06-28-14, 08:27 PM
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LOL, already did that hole saw thing. Got all the disks groomed with a razor blade and ready to go. Hand cut the ceiling holes true with a sawzall blade to avoid too much dust. Failed on getting the rest done though. I always think I can tackle jobs a lot faster than I do. California patch sounds way more advanced than I am capable.m I'll stick with the mesh tape.
 
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Old 06-28-14, 08:38 PM
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Mesh gets bad reviews...though I never had any problems with small jobs. Make sure to embed it in the mud well.
 
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Old 06-29-14, 03:06 AM
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Sticky tape [mesh] tends to fail unless coated with a setting compound like Durabond, I almost always use paper tape

Uncoated j/c can set for a long time and still be ok. It really depends on how much moisture it absorbs, sanding and primer/paint generally takes care of any minor damage to the j/c.

Why are you using 220 grit [or an electric sander] on j/c? 120 grit is generally fine enough for drywall work. The primer will fill in any sanding scratches left by the 120 grit.

I've patched with 'california patches' many times but never heard them called that
 
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