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King Truss Beam options for removing load bearing wall?

King Truss Beam options for removing load bearing wall?

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  #1  
Old 08-28-14, 02:33 AM
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King Truss Beam options for removing load bearing wall?

Hello,

I'm new to the forum but not new to houses. I recently bought my third one (biggest project yet) and I'm working on fixing it up. The house is a single story 24x30 in the main (original) structure with 2x4 trusses (king truss) every fourth one. I am going to remove a load bearing wall which separates the house at the 12' mark. I wanted to ask you guys before I go to the local lumber yard and speak to a project assistant/manager. I checked with the local municipality and no interior building permits are needed, they told me that any interior renovations do not need inspected.

What beam options are available given the trusses that I mentioned? I really like the idea of the hidden beam in the attic with hangers which the ceiling joists strap to because it is hidden away with posts which go down to the foundation. (I've seen them mentioned as "blind beam", "blind header" etc but I don't think that this is a viable option due to the king post and both "webs" which extend from the center of the truss to the peak and the half way points.

Is a blind header a possibility here? Could I run two beams (one on either side of the king post and strap my ceiling joists to them? I would run the straps over top and down the other side of each to prevent the beams from rolling one way or the other and then posts from each beam down to the floor. I cannot think of any way to temporarily cut out the king post and web posts to insert the beam.

Please advise.
 
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Old 08-28-14, 02:36 AM
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The top and bottom chords run in the same direction and are 16" OC. The center is also on top of the steel beam in the basement.
 
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Old 08-28-14, 03:24 AM
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After looking at this again, I'm wondering if there is a way for me to temporarily brace the "King" and "webs" as I insert a beam...
 
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Old 08-28-14, 03:32 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Trusses usually come with instructions not to cut any portion of them. This will weaken all the members, applying stress at places where there should be no stress. Building temporary walls on either side of the proposed removal is generally the best way to go. HOWEVER, I would be remiss if I didn't mention you should gain the services of a structural engineer before you dive head long into this project. He may give blessings using triple LVL beams, or he may not. We can't, certainly, do so without looking at the structure.
 
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Old 08-28-14, 03:36 AM
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Chandler,

Thank you for the response. I feel like if I were to add temporary walls on both sides of the current load bearing wall and then went to cut the load bearing wall out, those temporary walls would do nothing but create a cantilever for the entire structure to collapse. The temporary walls have nothing structural above them.
 
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Old 08-28-14, 04:15 AM
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Thus the suggestion for a structural engineer. The two temporary walls will be fastened to the bottom chords of the trusses they span. The load bearing wall you want to remove is running perpendicular to the trusses, I trust. I don't understand the cantilever effect you are talking about. They will only be a foot away from the load bearing wall. You will have more strength in the two load bearing temporary walls than you had with the single wall. Get the engineer in there. You don't want to have it come down around your ankles from information 600 miles away.
 
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Old 08-28-14, 08:30 AM
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I cannot think of any way to temporarily cut out the king post and web posts to insert the beam.
There is no way. It can't be done. The trusses cannot be altered in any way.

I just wanted to agree with Chandler. The two temporary walls you build will actually provide more support than the single load bearing wall you would be removing.

I think by cantilever, you mean that the 2 temporary walls will not be directly above the steel beam in the basement. They will be, however within a few feet of the beam below. The floor joists can easily distribute this load to the beam and perimeter foundation walls.

So your only problem is sizing of the beam and how to transfer load down to the foundation. An engineer can figure this easily. The engineer can also discuss with you if you need any panels (Short Walls) at either end of the beam to provide a measure of shear value.

This doesn't help you, but I wonder why they didn't place trusses 24" on center and no interior load bearing wall would have been needed. (Snow Load?)
 
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Old 08-28-14, 06:25 PM
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I'm not sure either handy one. This house is something special as all walls are 2x3
 
 

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