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hanging end piece of drywall - horizonal or vertical?

hanging end piece of drywall - horizonal or vertical?

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Old 08-30-14, 12:45 PM
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hanging end piece of drywall - horizonal or vertical?

I have a wall that needs drywalled in the bathroom, and it can be done with two 8x4 sheets horizontal, butted up against one vertical (because the overall length of this wall is around 11').
I know that the recommended way is to hang it horizontal, but in a situation like this where the end piece could be hung vertical without a cut, is that the best way to go? (so instead of 4 seams, i would have 3, but am i sacrificing anything in terms of look or strength?)
I know the seam will be a little odd too, it would have the beveled end of the vertical piece meeting up with the non-beveled edges of the horizontal pieces, but maybe one bevel is better than none?
 
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Old 08-30-14, 01:40 PM
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I always try to limit the cuts because that reduces the taping which is better for looks. Strength is not an issue, in your case.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 02:34 PM
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Horizontal is generally the best way to hang drywall but not always. Hard to tell without looking but you may have one of the exceptions.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 03:25 PM
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The 2 main reasons to hang rock horizontally is it will lessen any discrepancies in the framing [finished wall is less likely to appear wavy] and it's easier on your back to finish horizontal joints at the 4' level versus having to run a joint from ceiling to floor.

Sometimes it's easier to prefill the bevel prior to taping against a butt edge.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 03:29 PM
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Maybe two 12' sheets would be the easiest solution?
 
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Old 08-30-14, 03:36 PM
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Vic, I think there is a 3' section of wall that is already covered with drywall ..... or maybe I read the OP's post wrong
 
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Old 08-30-14, 03:43 PM
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After reading Vic's suggestion I went back and re-read the original question and I can't tell if there's drywall already there. If this is really an 8' tall and 11' wide wall, then Vic is right on with two 12' pieces of rock trimmed to 11' and hung horizontally.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 03:44 PM
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Commercial drywall is almost always hung vertically. I would hang it vertically rather then make a bas-tard joint. (one that is both tapered and non-tapered.)
 
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Old 08-30-14, 03:45 PM
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But he said 2 - 8' sheets would be enough to cover the wall. That won't cover an 11' wall unless there is already drywall on a portion of it. I agree that if the whole wall needs to be rocked, 12 sheets are the way to go.

I haven't been around much commercial work during the drywall stage, I wonder if steel studs have anything to do with them favoring vertical installation?
 
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Old 08-30-14, 03:57 PM
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I would hang it vertically rather then make a bas-tard joint.
I agree, 3 vertical joints isn't THAT big a deal, not that you would want to do a whole house done that way.

But he said 2 - 8' sheets would be enough to cover the wall.
Well, not really...he said...
it can be done with two 8x4 sheets horizontal, butted up against one vertical
and

instead of 4 seams, i would have 3
That would seem to indicate it's going to be all new. If there was 3ft existing, he'd only have 2, wouldn't he?
 
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Old 08-30-14, 05:09 PM
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Yes gunguy has it right, I basically have 11' worth of wall to drywall. The other 3' of it is Kerdiboard, but that's irrelevant for the topic here. (so basically a 14' wall, 11' will be drywall, 3' Kerdi).
So doing the easy math, most can figure out that it could take two horizontals and one vertical, or two horizontals and two smaller cut horizontals. That was basically my question, which way would you guys go?
(yes gunguy i would have loved to use 12' pieces and get it done with two sheets, I just don't have any means to transport it. I have a trailer that fits a 4x8 perfectly, but thats it. I wonder if those HomeDepot rental trucks have a 12' bed...)
 
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Old 08-30-14, 05:27 PM
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You can put supports on the bed of the trailer to keep the last 4ft from bouncing. Nope, the rentals are 8ft, trust me, I drove those things plenty of times to customers houses.

I'm going to delete your prior post since its a dupe, k?
 
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Old 08-30-14, 05:30 PM
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You would only need to buy 2 2x4x12' to rest the 12' drywall on. small price to pay to avoid 8' of basterd joint.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 05:46 PM
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Yes you can delete it, I searched for a way myself but dont think a post can be deleted by a regular user. Not sure why it double posted, I thought i was editing.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 05:50 PM
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Sounds like a good idea. So there's no need to secure the drywall in the trailer? It can just have the last 4' hanging out with no issue? It's pretty level here in VA, but i wasn't sure about it slowly bouncing its way out. It's about a 5 mile drive, 12 minutes.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 08:05 PM
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Well, you want to secure the 2x4 with some screws to the bed or straps, and then just strap the rock and 2x to the overhanging edge. Though...12' 2X prob wouldn't be much of an issue.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 04:48 AM
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2xs sticking out the back works well! I built the majority of my house using an old 1969 Bronco to transport material. I took the back seat out and stuck 16' 2xs under the front seats and then loaded up whatever I needed and strapped it down. There are a lot of hills where I live [I'm on top of a tall one] and never had any problems with the loads .... except for metal roofing, it did find on the hwy but I had to back up my steep driveway to keep the metal from slipping off before I reached the top.
 
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