How to best protect drywall edges?

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Old 11-14-14, 08:20 AM
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How to best protect drywall edges?

Hi y'all,

I am replacing a bathroom exhaust fan. The new one is larger than the old one, so I needed to widen the opening in the drywall ceiling. The new fan is mounted to the joists so that it sits on top of the drywall, i.e., the housing does not extend through the ceiling opening and does not sit flush with the underside of the drywall.

I would like to protect the inside edges of the drywall opening so that they won't crumble further and so the fan won't constantly be exhausting drywall particles.

The underside of the drywall, i.e., the ceiling of the bathroom, is painted with generic white paint. The top of the drywall (attic) has the usual paper backing. In between is the exposed drywall material (1/2").

What is a good tape that I could use and that will stick more or less permanently to these surfaces? I was trying a couple of tapes I had lying around, but they didn't stick well to at least one of the different surfaces. Are there any other (better) methods to protect the cut drywall edges?

Thank you very much in advance.

Cheers!
MM
 
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Old 11-14-14, 08:35 AM
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I'm not sure I totally understand the question maybe a pic would clarify

When taping drywall you use drywall tape with joint compound as the adhesive. You apply the tape coat and let the mud dry before applying 1-2 more coats of mud to finish dressing it off. There is no such thing as a generic white paint. All brands of white paint are slightly different both in color and sheen. It's next to impossible to touch up paint with a brand/line different that what was originally used.
 
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Old 11-14-14, 09:10 AM
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The new fan is mounted to the joists so that it sits on top of the drywall, i.e., the housing does not extend through the ceiling opening and does not sit flush with the underside of the drywall.
This is not correct. You may want to review mounting instructions again, and maybe remount fan.
Much like a recessed lighting fixture, the fan housing should extend downwards into cut out, making the housing flush with underside of drywall. Underside of drywall in your case is the bath room ceiling. Housing should not sit above ceiling cut out.
 
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Old 11-14-14, 09:20 AM
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The fan in question is the Panasonic WhisperGreen Lite (FV-08VKL4). It has flanges on the bottom on all four sides of the housing. This fan is normally meant to be installed in new construction such that at least one of the flanges is ideally screwed into a joist from the bottom. The drywall will then be mounted on top of that. As a consequence, the fan housing does not extend through the drywall; it effectively sits on top of the drywall.

However, there is nothing preventing anyone from mounting the fan such that the fan housing does in fact extend through the drywall. When replacing an old fan with this particular series of fan, one would either have to first disassemble the fan housing, which is doable but not intended by the manufacturer, or create a large opening in the drywall, fit the fan from below and then patch the drywall up later.
 
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Old 11-14-14, 09:25 AM
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When taping drywall you use drywall tape with joint compound as the adhesive. You apply the tape coat and let the mud dry before applying 1-2 more coats of mud to finish dressing it off. There is no such thing as a generic white paint. All brands of white paint are slightly different both in color and sheen. It's next to impossible to touch up paint with a brand/line different that what was originally used.
I didn't mean to imply that I wanted to patch anything up or paint. I just want to tape over the freshly cut drywall edge so that it won't continue to crumble over time. The portion of the tape that will be on the underside of the opening (i.e., the ceiling) will be covered by the fan grille, so its appearance isn't important. My mentioning the paint was to point out that I am looking for a tape that will stick well to painted surfaces (as well as paper and, ideally, drywall material).
 
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Old 11-14-14, 09:33 AM
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Got It,
If all you want to do is reduce dust and prevent further crumbling, I would do one of two things:
1) Paint edges of drywall with shellac based primer, this will eliminate dust particles
2) Coat edges of drywall with setting type joint compound (hot mud)

Or do both.
 
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Old 11-14-14, 10:22 AM
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Coating the cut edge of the drywall with caulking would also work.
 
 

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