ceiling issues

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Old 12-03-14, 11:08 AM
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ceiling issues

My ceiling has lines in it where it looks like that the seams of the drywall is. My question is what could be causing this? My ceiling is plaster not just dry wall so I'm confused. I want to address the main issue first.
 
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Old 12-03-14, 11:12 AM
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What do you mean by "not just drywall" ? Is there any drywall at all?
 
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Old 12-03-14, 12:53 PM
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Pulpo, I think he means the ceilings are plaster not merely drywall. Obviously recognizing the superiority of plaster over drywall.

About what are the dimensions of the areas between cracks?
How old is the house?
Do the lines look like the edges of joint tape?
 
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Old 12-03-14, 02:16 PM
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The age of the house should tell us what type of plaster system you have. Modern day plaster is just a plaster veneer over blue board [drywall] Has there been any water leaks [plumbing or roof]?

btw - welcome to the forums Steve!
 
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Old 12-03-14, 03:40 PM
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The only time that I have seen straight lines is when drywall is hung parallel to the joists.
 
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Old 12-03-14, 05:03 PM
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Just fixed a straight crack in my folk's kitchen. It's 1950's plaster over 16" wide pieces of 3/8" drywall lathe. Their straight crack was right in the middle of the room, and corresponds to where the rafters all have a "strut" that ties into the middle span of the ceiling joists.

If it's not from roof or snow loads or from someone tromping around in the attic, it could merely be from the expansion and contraction of the framing.

Someone had attempted to repair it in the past. I tore off the old tape, oil primed the old slick oil based paint that was underneath, then taped with paper tape and a setting-type joint compound... 2nd coated with the same, then skimmed with standard joint compound as the final coat.
 
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Old 12-03-14, 05:32 PM
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There are several lines on the ceilings. I have a rambler that was built in the 60s. There might have some water damage but not where these lines are. The joist are not parallel of theses lines either.
 
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Old 12-03-14, 11:32 PM
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About what are the dimensions of the areas between cracks?

A house of this vintage could be either gypsum plaster over gypsum lath or conventional drywall.
The dimensions of the panels can help us determine which you have.
Though the fix is probably the same either way.
If you have access to the attic above then screw some plywood across the joints between the joists where the cracks are then tape and finish them with joint tape and setting joint compound.
I like this for tape these days. FibaFuse Paperless Drywall Tape - SAINT-GOBAIN ADFORS
It has all the advantages of fiberglass but not the disadvantages of woven tape. In fact the only thing I find wrong with it is it is fiberglass when you handle it. Long sleeves and gloves would take care of most of that.
 
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Old 12-04-14, 08:15 AM
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I would suspect just drywall in a 60's era MN rambler. You know it has plaster?
 
 

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