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What type of Texture Ceiling is this!?

What type of Texture Ceiling is this!?


  #1  
Old 01-16-15, 04:33 PM
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Exclamation What type of Texture Ceiling is this!?

Hello,

Can someone let me know the name of this texture?

Its not pop corn ceiling...its not orange peel..

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  #2  
Old 01-16-15, 05:14 PM
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I'm not 100% sure, I believe that's called Stipple.
Marksr will be around, he's the expert.
 
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Old 01-16-15, 06:03 PM
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Around here that would be called a stomp texture. Most often a double crows' foot brush is used to slap the rolled texture. But I don't see any oval marks from the brush. Hard telling exactly what they used.
 
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Old 01-16-15, 07:03 PM
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Old 01-17-15, 03:41 AM
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We call that a stomp texture around here too. Generally joint compound is thinned down to about paint consistency, rolled on and then either a round brush or crowfoot brush is used to 'stomp' in the texture in the wet mud. That ceiling almost looks like a fat sponge was used to stomp the texture but I couldn't imagine doing an entire ceiling that way. The thinner you mix the mud, the lighter the texture will be. Thicker mud = heavier texture.

Are you needing to texture repairs?


btw - a stipple texture is achieved by thinning down the j/c and applying it with a shaggy roller [no stomping]
 
  #6  
Old 01-17-15, 11:02 PM
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I cut a hole (6" x 6") in my ceiling to do some electrical work and need to patch it up.

After I patch the drywall, should I sand it down, use a thin layer of Mud, and this texture brush?

Goldblatt G05260 Single-Crows Foot Texture Brush - Masonry Brushes - Amazon.com
 
  #7  
Old 01-18-15, 03:57 AM
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That brush should get you in the neighborhood. You'll have to experiment with the j/c consistency to get a decent match. You can practice on cardboard or whatever, if you texture the repair and it doesn't look right you can remove it while still wet or scrape/sand it when dry. For any area that small you should be able to just apply the texture with the brush .... instead of having to roll it on and then stomp it.
 
 

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