inside join on 45 degree o'jee


  #1  
Old 02-20-15, 07:08 PM
Q
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,653
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
inside join on 45 degree o'jee

These are not quarter rounds so they go on at a 45 degree angle between wall and ceiling.
How do I make an inside join when it's at an angle like this?


 
  #2  
Old 02-20-15, 07:26 PM
J
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 3,860
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Pictures are so small it's hard to see what your holding, sort of looks like crown molding?
Going to have to guess, are you trying to use a crown moulding on a cathedral ceiling?
Picture of where it's going would help, no close ups.
 
  #3  
Old 02-20-15, 08:26 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 62,550
Received 3,493 Upvotes on 3,136 Posts
The pictures are remotely hosted. Click on them for full size.
 
  #4  
Old 02-20-15, 08:45 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,416
Received 1,749 Upvotes on 1,573 Posts
In the bottom picture, you are holding the piece of bed moulding upside down. Traditionally, bed moulding is installed so that once it's on the wall, the cove is on the bottom.

At any rate, if you are trying to make an inside corner, you would either miter it, or cope it. If you are using a miter saw, you would place the moulding on the miter saw upside down. The fence is like your wall... the table of the miter saw is like the ceiling. So you do not lay it flat on the table and you do not stand it up against the fence. You put it "in position", just upside down.
 
  #5  
Old 02-21-15, 12:14 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 16,321
Received 38 Upvotes on 30 Posts
Oh, the word is ogee, sort of a double curve like a somewhat flattened S.
 
  #6  
Old 02-21-15, 04:22 AM
Q
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,653
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
It goes on at a 45 angle though unlike quarter rounds which go on flat?
So a standard mitre cut won't work I don't think...
If I put it in the mitre at 45 degrees how can I get an accurate cut
 
  #7  
Old 02-21-15, 04:52 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,240
Received 759 Upvotes on 664 Posts
As X explained, you set the molding against the miter saw's fence just like it would set on the wall/ceiling except for upside down. You don't lay the molding flat on the saw to cut it.
 
  #8  
Old 02-21-15, 05:37 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,416
Received 1,749 Upvotes on 1,573 Posts
Like this... upside down on the miter saw. Cut your 45. Once on the saw, a cut on the RIGHT end of the trim will actually be on the LEFT side of the trim once you turn the piece right side up. (this is probably what is confusing you)

Most people forget to turn it upside down, try to cut it like a quarter round, and then the miters don't match.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]46942[/ATTACH]

The crown molding above is placed upside down on the saw. If you don't have crown stops, as is pictured above, it is usually a good idea to cut a piece of 1x4 trim to the width of the crown rise so that you can feel with your fingers when you have the top edge of the crown sitting at exactly the right spring angle. A pencil line on the fence works, but is not as exact.
 
Attached Images  
  #9  
Old 02-21-15, 05:56 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,608
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
You can lay it flat on the miter saw table and cut with the detents on your miter saw if you want.
Name:  miter saw settings.jpg
Views: 317
Size:  35.3 KB
 
  #10  
Old 02-21-15, 06:07 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
And, if you look at Larry's chart, you will note that the angles are not 45 degrees, but 52 and 38 degrees respectively.

I would watch some videos and then sacrifice an 8 foot piece of your bed molding and practice. Upside down and backwards for the cut. One side goes into the corner with a regular square cut. The other gets a upside down and backwards with a 45 degree saw setting facing back toward the stock. Then take a coping saw and cut along the cut line to sculpt out the excess wood that would interfere with the piece already up on the wall. The key to coping crown is to hold it up at the angle it will sit on the wall. Meaning, flip the stock right side up, hold it at the appropriate angle to the wall, look down at it and cut away any wood you can see when you cope. That is the awkward part you have to learn. But trial and error will certainly prevent frustration if you have already sacrificed the piece and know you are just practicing.
 
  #11  
Old 02-21-15, 06:09 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,416
Received 1,749 Upvotes on 1,573 Posts
Larry's chart works for the 52 crown as pictured. If your bed moulding is 45 the angles on his chart will be different. You can get more charts by going to google images and type "crown chart".
 
  #12  
Old 02-21-15, 06:22 AM
I
Member
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Czizzi is on point with the coping. The only thing i would add is have a little sand paper handy to clean up coped edges as necessary to make a tighter joint.
 
  #13  
Old 02-21-15, 06:34 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
If you plan on painting your molding, you need not be perfect with the joints in the corners. A little painters caulking will hide a multitude of sins.

However, if you are installing stained moldings, you only get one chance to get it right. Nothing finer than having to make a double cope (one on each side of the same piece) to fit in as one piece on the final wall. Had to do that with custom milled Black Walnut once. They say, measure twice, cut once, - I think I measured about a dozen different times until I was completely happy and darn sure I didn't have a goof on the "inch" rule.
 
  #14  
Old 02-21-15, 07:07 AM
I
Member
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Red face

Caulk...every carpenter's best friend...czizzi again you are correct, i still sand even paintable copes as a force of habit. My methods are the same for stained and painted. Was once told by mentor, "we fail when we say its good enough". Lol use to hate those words...again not normally necessary. Milled black walnut? Better u than me hahaha...we have all had our share of stained trim but a custom piece is usually the tip of the iceberg...
 
  #15  
Old 02-21-15, 09:24 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,608
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
My step son used to help build the book cases at Barnes and Noble bookstores. Mahogany. Measure 3 times, write it down, call someone else in, let them measure to confirm your measurements, then cut. He said it was nerve wracking.
 
  #16  
Old 02-21-15, 09:36 AM
I
Member
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Omg...once we had a turkish bar imported obviously from turkey. Home owner wanted to surprise parents, the carpenter must have been norm' s
grand daddy...as we assembled the piece, biscuits and glue was mandatory...we literally had 3 journeymen carpenters in what seemed to be nato convention trying to figure this thing out...for god's sake it was just a bar....
 
  #17  
Old 02-21-15, 10:25 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
It has been years, but as I recall, the black walnut was well over $10.00 plus per linear foot. Not only did I have to stain and poly it, I had to install it. Every time I touched it, I was afraid of a fingerprint, or banging it on something during transport, letting it sit too long in the sun, touching the grass having the screen door clip it as I was bringing it into the house. I was lucky that it was a first floor install and I did not have to feed anything through an upstairs window to get it in.
 
  #18  
Old 02-21-15, 10:38 AM
I
Member
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Oils from fingers lol...i don't stain or paint...period my mistakes will stay obvious until finished...
 
  #19  
Old 02-21-15, 10:44 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,608
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
i don't stain or paint
We're brothers!!! Ask Marksr.
 
  #20  
Old 02-21-15, 04:08 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,240
Received 759 Upvotes on 664 Posts
Hey, somebody has to make the carpenters look good
 
  #21  
Old 02-21-15, 04:28 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Oils from fingers lol
If you get sweat/oils on a solid birch door (as an example) and then try to stain it, you will have issues with the stain taking. Probably goes for most woods - Probably driven folks like Marksr mad over the years with excess sanding to get the stain even.
 
  #22  
Old 02-21-15, 06:15 PM
I
Member
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I am fully aware of that which is the reason why i say no. .to many things to control...
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: