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Replacing lath and plaster with drywall

Replacing lath and plaster with drywall


  #1  
Old 03-23-15, 08:29 AM
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Replacing lath and plaster with drywall

I'm really looking for someone to say why this is a bad idea for my current situation, and then learn how to do it for future reference.

130 year old house in western New York. Balloon Frame construction. Previous owner blew in some insulation.

In a perfect world, I'd love to tear down the lath and plaster, put in some spray foam or roxul, and drywall it.

I assume;
1) This is not worth the cost (especially since this will be rental income property soon), and
2) There are a lot of issues in doing this.

My main question is; what are the issues and where can I look to learn about them.
1) Is it best to add furring strips to bring the wall thickness out to the window casings and allow for more insulation?
2) Can I go back later to do work on the ceilings, or should that be done first so wall drywall can help support?
3) Will there likely be structural issues taking down lath and plaster
4) Anything else that should be done while the walls are exposed?

Just giving me links is fine. Thank you.
 
  #2  
Old 03-23-15, 08:41 AM
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#1 - hard to say, how far do the casing protrude now? how will it affect the looks?
#2 - while it's better to hang ceilings first and then the walls, it can be done either way.
#3 - no
#4 - if you open up the walls that would allow you to update insulation and electrical. Because stud spacing wasn't as critical with plaster and lath, you might have to add studs to make it work better with drywall. Plaster is a better wall covering than drywall but sometimes it makes sense to replace it.
 
  #3  
Old 03-23-15, 08:56 AM
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#4 - The wiring is actually ok. Knob and tube was replaced at some point (probably when it was converted into an upper/lower duplex). The spacing of the studs that I have seen is sporadic, as expected.

Since I would most likely want to build out the (I assume) true 2x4 into today's version of a 2x6 to get better insulation, would it be better to add furring strips, keep the odd spacing and deal with it, simply add 2x6 at correct spacing and fit insulation where I can, or some other scheme? (I thought of building another wall with 2x2 at 16 on center in front and filling it all with roxul, but that strikes me as worst of both worlds).
 
  #4  
Old 03-23-15, 09:02 AM
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You'd really need to remove the plaster/lath first so you can better evaluate what needs to be done with the framing.
 
  #5  
Old 03-23-15, 10:19 AM
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So, nothing so inherently correct or wrong with it to say at this point. Good to know.

Thank you.
 
  #6  
Old 03-23-15, 10:28 AM
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Air sealing is generally the most important thing you can do in an old house when you've torn down walls to insulate.
 
  #7  
Old 03-23-15, 10:33 AM
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Yes, I do need to keep that in mind. Assuming I get to do that, what's the best way to seal?
 
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Old 03-23-15, 11:12 AM
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Spray foam is best but can be cost prohibitive caulking cracks/gaps can go a long ways toward sealing it up and in many climates a plastic vapor barrier is used.
 
  #9  
Old 03-23-15, 12:06 PM
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Air sealing is not only important, it is the number one improvement for cost and return. It is also far more involved than most people assume. When you are finished air sealing, turn your house upside down and fill it with water. If it only drips you did a good job. The vast majority wouldn't fill more than a foot or two and leak faster than you can pour it in. Joking, bur serious.

Here is a link: http://www.efficiencyvermont.com/ste...ide_062507.pdf

Even though this is going to "only be a rental", making it energy efficient justifies a higher rent and increases the resale value when you are done. And, there is no better time for this house than during a major remodeling effort.

Bud
 
  #10  
Old 03-23-15, 12:15 PM
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Bud is right about tenants and efficiency - we commonly get asked what it costs to heat and cool our units and being able to explain how they're energy efficient helps a lot.
 
  #11  
Old 03-23-15, 12:31 PM
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making it energy efficient justifies a higher rent and increases the resale value when you are done. And, there is no better time for this house than during a major remodeling effort.
The market I am in would never reflect this improvement with increased rent.

While I agree that doing this procedure during a major remodel would border on necessary and be very cost effective, my particular situation wouldn't really qualify. The prior owners did "good enough", which puts me in the difficult position of paying extra to undo "good enough" and THEN paying the cost of "correct". Oh, how (I assume) my life would be better if the house were simply gutted and I could have bought it for less and started from square one.

But, that was not the point of this thread. I appreciate all the wonderful ideas and hope that I can implement them some day.
 
  #12  
Old 03-23-15, 12:41 PM
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It doesn't necessarily equate to increased rent but it can easily make a difference in your vacancy rate - the lower that is, the better.
 
  #13  
Old 03-24-15, 05:44 AM
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One last question on this thread;

I don't want to do steps 2-9 perfectly without doing step 1 as well. How should I air seal my exterior walls if they are constructed this way (let me know if I am possibly wrong on how they are constructed, I haven't torn anything down to look)

Outside-->Vinyl siding-->foam board (might be taped at seams, might not be-->old wood siding-->??(is there a layer I dont' know about?)-->studs and some insulation-->lath and plaster
 
 

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