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Repair of plaster wall (interior side of exterior wall)

Repair of plaster wall (interior side of exterior wall)


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Old 07-25-15, 06:54 PM
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Repair of plaster wall (interior side of exterior wall)

i am repairing some the interior side of some exterior plaster walls in my 80 year old house. the problem areas are underneath some windows where there has been some water infiltration (which I am also repairing outside). I have removed the degraded plaster. I was thinking of using either durabond or easy sand. The problem is that there are now some small sections where I am down to the brick -- both the plaster top coat and the bottom coat (grey plaster? grey mortar from the 1930s?) were too degraded. I absolutely need to finish this in about three days.

I was thinking of three options, but I see problems with them:

1) Use durabond to cover the small sections of exposed brick, and then easy sand. But I am pretty sure durabond is not meant to be used as the first coat of a "replastering" and applied directly to brick.

2) Use mortar / cement on top of the exposed brick and then durabond or easy sand. If water were to infiltrate again, the mortar won't degrade. But the instructions for the durabond / easy sand state to "wait 60 days over new concrete." I cannot wait more than overnight at most.

3) use structo-lite, which is base coat plaster -- the closest to the original product. I know at can then use durabond and finish with easy sand the day after. But the structo lite is gypsum based, and there could be new water infiltration in the future, and I am concerned the structolite will again degrade.

I need to buy the material tomorrow morning and apply whatever I need to apply over the brick before noon. What should I use??

thanks!

(Ps: the old base coat is grey, not brown. can it be old plaster base coat? or is it old mortar?)
 
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Old 07-25-15, 07:11 PM
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If I understand the problem correctly, you shouldn't have to touch the brick from the inside. Aside from that, can't the damaged plaster be cut back to the studs & replaced with sheet rock? It seems easier than doing all that mixing with Durabond.
 
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Old 07-25-15, 07:18 PM
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thanks Pulpo. This is an old house -- no studs. The exterior walls are just brick, the base coat of grey plaster (or mortar, I am not sure), and the finish white coat of plaster. Because of the water damage, there are some small sections where both the grey coat and the white coat of plaster crumbled, and I am now left with exposed brick.
 
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Old 07-25-15, 07:22 PM
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Is it wood lath behind the plaster? The lath has to be held by something. Can you add studs or something to use as nailers?
 
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Old 07-25-15, 07:36 PM
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No. No lath. Just brick and the two coats of plaster. I unfortunately don't have the time to add laths. Plus, the exposed brick is just in a couple of small areas. I just want to know what I should use as first coat directly on the brick: durabond, Structo-Lite, or cement.
 
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Old 07-25-15, 07:43 PM
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I would probably use a Type N mortar mix with a bonding agent.
 
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Old 07-25-15, 07:54 PM
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I think mortar mix will take too long to dry/cure.

I would recommend Structo-lite for your base coat and then finish with some easy sand speed set (20 min) Structo-lite sets up very fast, bonds well, and things bond to it well, but is not easy to sand. Durabond is fine too but also is a pain to sand so just be sure to under fill using Durabond or Structo-lite. I have used Structo-lite for repairing where a new door met some concrete. Worked very well.
 
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Old 07-25-15, 07:55 PM
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Thanks. But I thought durabond / easy sand cannot be applied to new concrete for several weeks. I must finish in 3 days, painting included. Would applying dura / easy on hours-old mortar be a problem?
 
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Old 07-25-15, 08:03 PM
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Thanks Tolyn. In the event that there is additional water infiltration underneath the windows, which would be more water resistant : Structo-Lite or durabond? I will repair the water issue, but it might return.
 
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Old 07-25-15, 08:25 PM
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I think they are both very water resistant. However your finish coat (setting type easy) will be even less so, but still better then standard mud.
 
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Old 07-26-15, 03:47 AM
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Durabond is very moisture resistant! I worked with a boy maybe 30 yrs ago that had an old car with a lot of rust that he patched with durabond I was really surprised that it was still there a year or so later. I've never had to patch plaster directly to the brick but I wouldn't be scared to use durabond that way. I've never used any structo-lite or any other plaster product
 
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Old 07-26-15, 04:18 PM
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SStructoLite is not moisture resistant. It has more body and will fill in me coat what might take several to fill with Durabond. Also, my experience with StructoLite is that it sets. Very slowly, too slowly in my opinion. You want to add some raw gypsum or some old crushed plaster to the mix to get it going. You. An use lime or cement to hurry it up too. Since you are in a hurry and most likely have already done this, let us know what you did and how it worked. Sometimes what really matters is using what is available to get the job done. dura one is not made for the but will work. Mortar is the most water resistant but slow setting unles you add some luminite to it to pop it like a firecracker. A.l of these arcane things involve buying more material and more of it than he need for the job. Get it done. Then if it goes bad use something different th next time. Then if that goes bad hire it done. Someone who knows what to use and has the material on hand could do this in a couple hours.
 
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Old 08-20-15, 08:14 PM
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I'm agree with you. It's be better
 
 

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