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Tongue & Groove Pine Ceiling over drywall

Tongue & Groove Pine Ceiling over drywall


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Old 07-27-15, 06:19 PM
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Tongue & Groove Pine Ceiling over drywall

I finally got all my boards finished, looking good, and ready to hang, but I have ran into a roadblock. How does one fit the paneling into the groove when dealing with slight warped boards? I know there is a tool for this (by bowrench), but since I am installing over drywall, I am unable to use the ceiling joists as leverage. Is there another trick to doing this?
 
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Old 07-28-15, 03:03 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Hopefully you don't have any boards that have "that" much bow in them. You will also need 2" finish nails to go through your tongue, sheetrock and into the rafter/joists. I use a scrap piece of T&G, placing the groove over the tongue of the new wood and tapping it into place. A bowrench works great for decking, but will mess up T&G if too much pressure is applied to the tongue. You don't have that option, anyway.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 03:46 AM
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I can't imagine the boards being bowed so bad that gentle persuasion wouldn't put them in place.

What size boards are they? [mainly how thick] did you finish them outside or in a humid area?
 
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Old 07-28-15, 06:17 AM
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How bad are they. and about how many are curled?
If there's just a few set them aside and use them for the needed cut pieces on the ends.
You do know to only nail where the studs are, right?
First row has to be perfectly straight so it's best to snap a chaulk line to follow.
All the one's I've done I used a Narrow crown pneumatic staple gun for several reasons.
The rectanguler bumper lines right up on the top of the tongue, less likely to split the tongue, does not get in the way of the groves, light weight.
Cutting your butt joints at a 45 deg. angle, making sure they fall on a joist will prevent gaps from opening up.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 06:25 AM
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As mentioned, you can usually use a short scrap and hammer on it to drive the pieces together. But if they want to spring apart, you need to use 2 scraps. One scrap will be temporarily screwed to a joist or two just above the other scrap, which will be short and will fit onto the tongue of the piece you are installing. Leave an 1/8" gap between scraps 1 & 2. Then insert a prybar between the two and gently pry to the side to force your bowed piece together. The first scrap is short because it has to fit between the joists since you have to be able to nail the tongue into the joists as you pry it tight.

I will always use dots of construction adhesive on a ceiling like this, in addition to nailing. These ceilings are so labor intensive that you definitely don't want them to move, buckle or pop loose. Just a cheap way to cover your back side.

If you have pieces that are too bowed, either don't use them, or cut them into shorter pieces and use them where possible.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 05:44 PM
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I live in CO @ about 8800ft, so the humidity is relatively low here all of the time. I kept the boards inside a while before starting to hang as well.

The groove doesn't seem to be very tight on some boards, so even if its off a quarter of an inch, i am unable to keep it there without some sort of brace to hold in place while I secure it. With the help of a friend (thanks Jeff!), we have come up with a nifty solution (see pic).

I'll just be sure to save the straightest boards when i get to the other end of the wall!

Thanks everyone for your input and for the adhesive tip!! I have plenty left over when I converted a storage room to a small bedroom. I'll make sure i finish the boards up with some.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 07:23 PM
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You're putting it up backwards It appears you have a groove showing and should have the tongue showing. You nail at an angle through the tongue into your support members.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 07:54 PM
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haha, that would be something, but that is the tongue side
 
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Old 07-29-15, 03:52 AM
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Picture angle made it look like the groove. Carry on. We did this one over existing sheetrock, and had the boards stained and lacquered by a painter prior.

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Old 07-29-15, 06:11 AM
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Beautiful! We plan on doing most of the house this way, especially upstairs. I have vaulted ceilings in the living room as well (18 feet at the center), which i probably will not try to do myself. I figured this 12x12 room would be very easy, and quick, but i learned that is not the case. The staining and finishing alone took me a while, although once i got my process down, it went a little quicker.

I like the way it looks without the center groove in your picture. I will most likely use that side for the remainder of the home.
 
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Old 07-29-15, 06:25 AM
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Hi Terry, I've been following as I too love the look of wood. But my business is as an energy auditor and I just want to mention to be sure you have an air sealed layer of drywall under that T&G. T&G cannot be sealed well so the air barrier must be in place.

Also, with the vaulted ceiling, review your insulation levels as much easier to add more before the wood goes up and eliminate any recessed lights or convert them to air tight IC rated. Very few vaulted ceiling have sufficient insulation and often poor ventilation.

Just a heads up,
Best
Bud
 
 

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