Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Walls and Ceilings
Reload this Page >

How to prep for finishing basement walls w steel studs?

How to prep for finishing basement walls w steel studs?


  #1  
Old 08-05-15, 11:52 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 16
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question How to prep for finishing basement walls w steel studs?

I am installing a subfloor by Tyroc, and I want to use steel studs for the framing. I have several questions on what materials to use. I am trying to finish the basement as green and mold proof as possible. Currently there are no outstanding moisture issues. I want to make sure what I build will stand the test of time and any kind of moisture in the unforeseen future.

  • Do I install the framing first, and then the subfloor, or should I put the track on top of the Tyroc floor panels?
  • How do I prep the walls before putting up the framing?
  • What kind of insulation is inorganic/mold proof? I'm not sure what to choose because there are so many products out there. From what I've read I should not glue rigid foam panels to the concrete because it can trap moisture.
  • What kind of mold free drywall options are there? I've seen wall panels, but I don't want to spend too much on the walls. The panels(from Total Basement Finishing) have to get installed by a professional, and I'd rather get something I can do myself.

I might have more questions later, but really hoping someone can help me with these for now.
 
  #2  
Old 08-05-15, 02:25 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
Hi hero,
To put my comments into perspective, I hate basements.
Or, to be more specific I hate finished basements. The problem is, all of those moisture concerns you have needed to be addressed from the outside when the house was built. Even that spray on tar that is often used only slows the moisture, but does not stop it.

Once a house is built without the complete water barrier needed to keep it dry (probably 98% of homes), you enter the moisture management phase. Example, moisture will always be moving through the concrete. Give it a place to escape and it will not accumulate. Add the class I vapor and the moisture level on the outside of that Vb will slowly increase until it matches the moisture content of the ground outside. If you live in an extremely dry region, then there is no problem. For the rest of us, we manage.

To your questions.
1. I'm not an expert on framing up a basement wall, but I prefer putting the wall in first and then the floor. If you bust a pipe the floor will need more attention than the wall.
2. & 3. Prep the walls?? I prefer a class II rigid insulation, omitting and foil or plastic facing. Your code will tell you how much is needed but it does allow a minimal amount of drying to the inside. Some other paint on treatments are intended to stop water (never perfect) but do not stop moisture vapor. As for trapping water, there should be no water problems to start with. But recent advice even allows foil faced, they say a little moisture back there isn't a problem. I like to allow some drying to the inside.
4. I've seen mold grow on shinny metal surfaces. As for mold free drywall, the issue is again moisture management. Once completed this space will need to be fully conditioned, ac in the summer (or a dehumidifier) and dry heat in the winter. Your specific basement will have specific needs and you need to monitor the humidity and keep it below the problem range.

Have you been reading the building science corp articles?

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 08-05-15, 03:56 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 16
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
All good points. I just had an idea, how stupid would it be to finish the floor with Tyroc, and laminate, and then drywall the ceiling, but leave the concrete walls? I'm building a home gym, so I really wouldn't mind if I have drywall around me or not. It seems like the more you "finish" the more that can go wrong! Maybe I can simply smooth out the concrete with hydraulic cement and then slap some paint on there. Thoughts?
 
  #4  
Old 08-05-15, 04:27 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
I agree with the KISS approach, but I do like some insulation on the walls in PA.
Photo 4 in this link is where I would start.
Understanding Basements | Building Science Corporation
As for the floors, the Tyroc has good advertising, but I'm not familiar with the product. Others may have used it and will comment.
But a stained concrete floor will last forever.
As for smoothing out the floor, I've used diamond discs on concrete and they do an amazing job. I have never tackled and entire floor, but you would be impressed at how easily the diamond surface cuts through concrete or any stones it encounters. Just dusty, but that can be handled.

My trade is energy efficiency, but I did some building before retiring. That link will also show how to air seal and insulate the rim joist that rests on top of the foundation. Once you insulate and condition that basement (and manage the small amount of moisture passing through) you will also enjoy nice warm floors above.

Others will be along.
Bud
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: