Best Way To Shave 1/8" Off Drywall?

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Old 02-16-16, 02:23 PM
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Best Way To Shave 1/8" Off Drywall?

My electrian took off a 6" x 20" piece of drywall above our stove range (see attached photo), and now I'm trying to put it back & patch up the seams. The drywall used to sit flat against the wood behind it, but now it protrudes about 1/8" because of the metal plates the electrician nailed into the wood.

I thought one way to make it sit flush is to shave the back of the drywall piece to make room for the metal plates. But I'm afraid that there may not be a way to shave off 1/8" off the back of the drywall without having the drywall crack and crumble. Is there a trick to do this?

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 02-16-16, 02:34 PM
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On an area like that, I'd use thinner drywall (comes as thin as 1/4) and shim the areas next to the plates so it's all even (actually you want it slightly inset compared to the old area so you can fill in with mud to get it nice and even). Might have to go to drywall supply house to find thinner drywall.

Other option would be to remove the metal plates and cut away some of the wood, and then reinstall them flush with the surface of the wood.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 03:29 PM
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I'm also with option #2. Remove the nail plates, chisel out some of the wood to recess the nail plates and then install drywall as normal. I do this all the time when doing bathroom remodels, it is a clean look when finished.

If you remove the paper from the drywall, it looses all its integrity. Think of how you cut drywall, you score it and it simply snaps in half. Worry more about how to blend in that texture as it will be fun if you don't have the right equipment.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 03:39 PM
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I agree with using thinner drywall or recessing the plates but you could get by with giving them a good lick with a hammer [to make sure they are in as far as they will go] and then float the drywall joint out with joint compound.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 03:39 PM
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Any tips on matching the texture?
 
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Old 02-16-16, 03:43 PM
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I would probably slice the paper backing on either side then plow out the back with a drywall rasp. It would take about 60 seconds. Just would want to be careful with it as you handle it so you don't break it. Once its installed it will be fine.

The texture looks like a thinned splatter texture. You'd need a hoppper/gun and a compressor. If its an area where the texture needs to be perfect, mask off side walls and retexture that entire wall. If you try and do a small area it will stand out like a sore thumb.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 03:46 PM
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tips on matching the texture
It looks like a heavy orange peel texture. You can buy aerosol cans of orange peel texture but I don't know if they can spray it that heavy. Ideally you'd use a hopper gun to spray on thinned down joint compound. Alternatively you could pat the texture on with a big sponge.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 03:55 PM
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Carefully and lightly score the drywall so that you can remove the texture in the area where the tape will set. Try not to remove all the paper for reasons stated above, you just want to be able to recess the tape slightly. Then install the tape as you normally would, float a thin layer of joint compound and with a wet sponge blend the joint compound into the surrounding texture so that the appears through it. When you sand your joint compound you should have a smooth transition from flat to already textured, it should not be a hard line per se. Then when you spray texture you gently feather out the smooth area into the already textured area so everything blends nicely. Hopefully this will help, pictures are small but illustrates what I was trying to describe. You can rent hopper guns that attach to an air compressor.

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Old 02-16-16, 04:06 PM
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If you try and do a small area it will stand out like a sore thumb.
Aargh! I was afraid of that!
 
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Old 02-16-16, 04:19 PM
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Not drywall related, but was this new cable ran for a Microwave Hood Combo?

If so, the nail plates are directly in the area where the wall mounting plate needs secured at the top and bottom right.

If this is a microwave, I wouldn't seal up the wall yet, you might need some blocking and now would be a good time to add it.

If it's a normal vent hood, your OK with patching as recommended here.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 04:19 PM
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If you want, practice on scrap material cardboard until your texturing technique is good enough to move to the wall.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 04:22 PM
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IMO a pro might be able to blend it in, but the average DIYer sucks at finishing drywall and texturing. Just trying to be realistic and help you do what's going to look best. In this case I think you might be ahead to texture corner to corner so it all looks the same. Getting the butt joints smooth, matching the texture and the feathering are all tricky.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 04:29 PM
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If this is a microwave, I wouldn't seal up the wall yet, you might need some blocking and now would be a good time to add it.
Yes, it is for an over-the-range microwave. What do you mean by "you might need some blocking"? What is a "blocking"?
 
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Old 02-16-16, 04:52 PM
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Forget the blocking for now. Since it is a MW being installed, can you post the model number.

Also post the measurement from the bottom of the upper cabinet to the bottom of the lowest nail stop plate.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 05:23 PM
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Still not sure what blocking is but I see generally what you mean -- I looked at the installation instructions for the model I want (GE Profile PVM9215SFSS installation instructions PDF), and I see that the mountain bracket is likely to overlay right on top of where the nail stop plates are. So, I'm going to need to place screws while avoiding the brackets. I think I should get microwave and the included wall bracket before going further with patching the drywall....
 
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Old 02-16-16, 05:33 PM
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It looks like "Hole B" of the bracket (see attached diagram from installation instructions) will be close to the nail plates. I'm hopeful that it will be just to the inside of the nail plate. If it does run into the plate, then I'll just take the nail plate off (making sure the screw doesn't go into the electric cable!)
 
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Old 02-16-16, 05:55 PM
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"then I'll just take the nail plate off"

Just move the plate to the left if possible, don't abandon it. If you can't move it, don't place a screw in hole B, it's not critical.

Hole D is more important and it looks like it will be left of the plates. If not, drill a hole as close to hole D as you can while avoiding the plates, nearby will do and it can be a toggle or screw into wood.

Should be no problem with A and C, either toggles or screws into wood can be used.

The bracket needs to be screwed into at least one stud between holes C and D, area E on the drawing and that's important.
 
 

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