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Is a drywall rasp and skim coating the best way to deal with this?

Is a drywall rasp and skim coating the best way to deal with this?

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  #1  
Old 02-20-16, 04:25 PM
L
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Is a drywall rasp and skim coating the best way to deal with this?

Wife and i just purchased a home and someone put really thick texture swirls above the fireplace. I'm guessing they did it to hide imperfections but we'd like to make is smooth. Is knocking the sharp edges down with a drywall rasp and then having someone skim coat it the most efficient and cost effective way to deal with this? Name:  20160218_130026.jpg
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  #2  
Old 02-20-16, 04:32 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Scraping down what you can and then skim coating is probably the best plan of attack. IF the mud was never painted you can get it wet and scrape and smooth it with a sponge.
 
  #3  
Old 02-20-16, 04:40 PM
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If it has been painted, I've had best luck with a carbide hook scraper, like this:

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The 2-3 inch wide works best; small enough to get good pressure, big enough that it doesn't take forever. The carbide just doesn't dull. Makes a big mess but works very well. Good to do a lead test before scraping though if your house is older than 40 years or so.
 
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Old 02-20-16, 04:47 PM
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If it's latex paint - there isn't any lead as it was only in some oil base paints. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html
 
  #5  
Old 02-20-16, 04:57 PM
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Thanks for the advice everyone =) I bought a rasp like this one earlier today:

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Would the carbide hook scraper work better than this? It was built in 94 so no lead paint.
 
  #6  
Old 02-20-16, 05:31 PM
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Never tried a rasp like that...let us know. Other than the hook scraper, I have also used a wide floor scraper (like a stiff, foot wide putty knife blade on a long handle). It worked ok on the texture peaks, but mostly just rode over the smoother bumps. I think it would work fine on texture that hadn't been painted.
 
  #7  
Old 02-21-16, 04:52 AM
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IMO a pull scraper is quicker/easier to use than a rasp but either should remove enough j/c to get the wall ready for a skim coat.
 
  #8  
Old 02-21-16, 09:21 PM
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Tried the rasp and it was taking a while. Got a scraper and it worked so much faster. Thanks for the tips this will save me a bunch of time =)
 
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