Installng a LVL beam

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-10-16, 01:28 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Installng a LVL beam

I am home owner renovating a house and am removing a load bearing wall. I consulted with an engineer and he let me know I need to install a LVL beam and 2 posts. I know I will need temporary support walls on each side of the demoed wall and the engineer already confirmed the load carries through the basement to a set of posts and footings he inspected. For the beam his exact instructions are:

"An LVL(laminated veneer lumber) beam of specifications 6.5X11.875 with 6x6 Columns 1 and 2 may be used. The beam will be protrude completely into the framing on the west side with 3 ply- 2X6 studs underneath it stacked vertically on the foundation wall. The columns should be tied to the beam with the help of screws. As the total length of the beam is approximately 24, the beam may be spliced with the help of additional 3 long 2X12s on both sides of the splice bolted together."

I have a few questions regarding the beam itself:
1. Would I be looking at finding a beam 6.5" thick? Or would I be using multiple pieces? From my understanding it would be multiple boards sistered together
2. If I use multiple pieces what are the easiest ways to sister them together properly?
3. He mentions splicing pieces with more wood, but could I not simply stagger multiple boards when I sister them, so that its not 2 large beams being spliced together, but the seams are still spread out?
4. Is there any other information I should know about this process?

Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-10-16, 01:39 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,584
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

1. I see this as one beam unless any/every joint in the beam has a column going to ground for support beneath it.
2. Engineer says 3' 2x12"s on each side and you would glue and nail these.
3. Not following this unless you mean could you sister with longer pieces, which you could.
4. Generally speaking, you should be asking all of these questions of the engineer.
 

Last edited by stickshift; 08-10-16 at 02:15 PM.
  #3  
Old 08-10-16, 01:49 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,197
Received 714 Votes on 661 Posts
I would have someone deliver you 4 pc of 1.75x11.875 lvl, 24' long, assuming you have a window or something that you can open to slide them in. You can fasten these together by nailing, along with ledgerlok lags. Be sure you have it on a perfectly flat surface when nailing them together. You dont want to put it together bowed. Eliminate the splices.
 
  #4  
Old 08-10-16, 02:03 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,964
Received 676 Votes on 625 Posts
1. Like SXleeper mentioned, for residential use you'll likely get 1 3/4" thick beams that you'll have to attach together to form your beam.

2. How you attach the beams will be per the Engineer or the LVL manufacturers instructions. The important thing to remember is that it is an engineered product and you need to form up the beam and install it as instructed. Generally it involves a number of nails or screws driving into the members at a prescribed spacing. Through bolts and lag bolts are generally not permitted unless specifically specified in the engineering.

3. I think the longest LVL I've used have been 22 or 24' and the members come full length so there is no splicing. Usually they are a bit long and need to be trimmed for length.

4. All you need to know is to know and follow the Engineering. They will say how many fasteners, what type and where they should go. When my inspectors come the first thing they want is the engineering documentation and they confirm that you formed up the beam according to the fastening schedule.

Drilling a hole or cutting (except for length) a member or the beam is a big NO NO unless it's called out in the engineering documentation. Nails and screws are generally permitted because they don't cut or remove the wood fibers of the beam, so if you put in a nail in the wrong spot it's best to leave it and put another one in the correct location.
 
  #5  
Old 08-10-16, 02:54 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the welcome and for awesome responses!

I do plan to speak to my engineer, he is out of the office today and I found this place and everyone seemed so helpful.

If the beams are 1 3/4" then 4 of them would make 7" and not the 6.5" he specified, does that change anything?

The span is actually slightly larger than 24'. He says approximately because it spans 23' 10" between the wall and posts, but that doesn't account for the placement in the wall of the house over the foundation which is actually about another 5 inches. Does that mean I would need to find beams that are 25'?

Can the beam be built up in place? I worry that 4 beams of that length all together would be hard for me to lift even with a few people helping.

My other questions was just if there is a way to use shorter lengths like 12' long. And then because it would be 4 beams wide, could you spread out the seams of the shorter lengths boards so they don't overlap anywhere and not need to splice it with additional lumber? Similar to how you might in a top plate of framing. Or they need to be one solid piece for structural reasons?
 
  #6  
Old 08-10-16, 03:19 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The beam will be protrude completely into the framing on the west side with 3 ply- 2X6 studs underneath it stacked vertically on the foundation wall.
You will have to ask the engineer for specific info. It sounds like the engineer wants the foundation wall built out with 3 each 2x6 boards, making a post and a wider bearing surface. Why I don't know.
I also wonder if the engineer is telling you there is no way to insert a beam in one piece.
If that's the case, they should have provided you with specifics on where and how to make the splices, including specifying hardware.
 
  #7  
Old 08-10-16, 03:45 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,197
Received 714 Votes on 661 Posts
If the beams are 1 3/4" then 4 of them would make 7" and not the 6.5" he specified, does that change anything?
Yeah, it's 1/2" bigger. You can ask him and I'm sure he will approve it since it exceeds his spec.

Does that mean I would need to find beams that are 25'?
Yes. Shouldn't be a problem. They are typically very long (up to 80') and cut to the length you specify when you order them.

Can the beam be built up in place?
Yes, as long as you can keep it straight... follow a chalk line or install a cleat along a chalk line. You will probably need to build a perpendicular temporary wall under each end and add a stud underneath each LVL as you set each one up there and fasten them together.

My other questions was just if there is a way to use shorter lengths like 12' long.
It goes against every rule of carpentry to create a splice when material that is long enough can be obtained and used... because its preferrable when splices can be eliminated. But you are free to do whatever your engineer will allow.
 
  #8  
Old 08-19-16, 11:13 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you everyone for all the help on this. Between what you have all told me and going back to the engineer we have finalized the plans and are going ahead with the install in a week.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: