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Drywall: Horizontal vs. Vertical Installation?

Drywall: Horizontal vs. Vertical Installation?

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  #1  
Old 08-22-16, 04:41 PM
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Question Drywall: Horizontal vs. Vertical Installation?

From what I have seen, It appears that drywall is typically installed Horizontal.

I was just looking at my basement and it seems as though with my setup and the walls being just under 8' I would be better of running the Drywall Vertical.

Is there any disadvantages that I should take into consideration when running Drywall Vertical vs Horizontal?
 
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Old 08-22-16, 04:51 PM
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There are probably a thousand threads on this topic. You can certainly do it however you like. Running it vertically does eliminate butt joints. However you will have vertical tape joints every 4', and if you do a crummy job of finishing, it will look like railroad tracks when you look down the wall and the light shines across them. You also need to have a perfect layout, 16" oc and plumb in order to split the stud 50/50. Running vertically you will eventually run off your 4' layout and wind up with a sheet that only hits on 1/4" of stud, then you have to add a stud, etc, etc. When you run horizontally, you use sheets that are the maximum length you can fit in the basement... and cut the sheet as long as it needs to be so that it breaks in the middle of a stud. Either way you lay it you will be cutting 6" off the sheet so you aren't saving on materials one way or the other. Most guys want to tape, finish and sand a belly band that is right in front of them, (4' high) and not have to stoop up and down a hundred and one times.
 
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Old 08-22-16, 05:09 PM
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Sorry, I only looked on the first couple pages ( should have used the search :/ ) Perfect explanation Xsleeper. I think I'll stick with Horizontal My back will probably be a mess crouching and stretching every 4 ft and adding studs when the on center goes off center doesn't sound fun. Glad I asked! thank you
 
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Old 08-22-16, 05:40 PM
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It's always nice to get really long sheets, even 16'ers if you can get them down there with some help.... the less butt joints the better, as far as taping is concerned. Problem is you cant usually get long ones down the stairs.
 
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Old 08-22-16, 05:43 PM
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A long story short, horizontal is better. It braces the wall similar to a diagonal wall brace. If you hang the drywall vertically you are only bracing 4' of wall, actually less because the joints are weak.
Going horizontal and staggering the joints, you are bracing at least 12' of wall and as said, the wall will look straighter or you can straighten it. You can't go wrong.
 
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Old 08-22-16, 06:08 PM
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Xsleeper, I already have the 8 footers and they were near impossible to get downstairs haha
Thanks Handyone, also very good points!
 
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Old 08-23-16, 03:22 AM
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I would add that you want to hang the top full piece of drywall first so the cut edge is next to the floor where it will get covered up by the baseboard. Keeping the drywall approximately 1/2" of the floor prevents it from wicking up any moisture that gets on the floor.
 
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Old 08-23-16, 04:16 AM
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Personally I would put the horizontal cut edge at the ceiling, hanging it first.
 
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Old 08-23-16, 04:33 AM
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Why? not having the beveled edge at the floor makes installing the base easier.
 
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Old 08-23-16, 05:03 AM
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Several reasons.... I rarely use base that short... it keeps the joint 4' high so less stooping... and a drywall roll lifter wont damage a finish edge on bottom as easily as a cut edge.

Same bottom edge as any other 8' or 9' wall but without the ripper on top.
 
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Old 08-23-16, 05:13 AM
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I agree with the higher the mid joint is the easier it is on your back! While I have one of those little roll lifters I seldom use it but understand how it could damage a cut edge. I've caulked/painted a lot of base [3" or taller] that was kicked in a little because of the bevel. Have worked behind a couple of trim carpenters that used cardboard for shims under the bottom of the baseboard .... don't know if there were any long term consequences to that or not.
 
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