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Do I need to start and end drywall on a stud?

Do I need to start and end drywall on a stud?

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Old 01-04-17, 04:40 AM
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Do I need to start and end drywall on a stud?

I'm putting up some drywall and I was I wondering if I need to start and end the drywall on a stud. If so, do I just cut the drywall if it's a bit longer and passes the stud? What about a drywall that is a bit short of reaching a stud? What should I do so that it's more sturdy?
 
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Old 01-04-17, 05:00 AM
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Yes, you need to start and stop drywall on a stud. Every edge of the sheetrock needs to be supported continuously. Cut the sheetrock down so it's edge is in the middle of a stud. Try to put your cut edge in a corner because the factory edges are tapered so when you tape and mud it ends up flat. When you cut the side you remove that taper which makes your tape and mud stand proud of the flat surface.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 05:39 AM
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Most drywall is 4x8 or 4x12, Studs are 16 or 24 inch on center. Properly framed walls will line up with drywall edges. If to long cut back to next stud. or if just a little long add a nailer. Get first sheet lined up right and rest should fall into place.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 05:59 AM
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About the only time you wouldn't end drywall on a stud would be when installing a patch and then you'd screw lumber to the existing drywall to attach the patch piece to. With new installation it's better to cut the drywall to fit [as mentioned above] or add a stud where needed.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 06:39 AM
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Thank you so much for the tip. What if the drywall fall short of reaching the next stud? What do I do then?
 
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Old 01-04-17, 06:56 AM
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I purchased the 4 by 10 feet long instead of a 4 by 8 and now it's two feet longer. So, I need to cut back to the stud and start from there then.

Another question I have is, if my bottom drywall is not flush with the top or the sides, what are some ways I can make it look better?
 
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Old 01-04-17, 08:28 AM
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You can add a stud to the wall if that is easier than cutting the drywall.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 08:32 AM
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if my bottom drywall is not flush with the top or the sides, what are some ways I can make it look better?
Cut it better .... or did I misunderstand the question?
 
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Old 01-04-17, 08:38 AM
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Cut it better .... or did I misunderstand the question?
The problem I have is that when I'm putting the bottom drywall in, it's bulging at some part and some are slightly below the existing top drywall. It's not set flush with existing drywall even though it's tight against the wall and stud.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 08:50 AM
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Trim the end of the sheet so the top will fit better. 1/4" gaps are ok.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 09:31 AM
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I don't have much problem with gap between two drywall. The problem I have is one drywall is not flushed with another so when I tape and put mud on it, you can see that the joint is bulging in one on wall.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 01:31 PM
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A pic might help, maybe I'm a little dense today

Is this a beveled edge against a flat edge? or is something behind the drywall pushing it out?
 
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Old 01-04-17, 01:47 PM
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If the new drywall bulges out past the old it sounds like he missed pulling a nail or else its sitting on top of a piece of crumbled drywall that wasn't cleaned off. If the new drywall is recessed behind the old, it's probably a tapered edge against a non tapered edge.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 05:17 PM
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There is a wAy to joint two ends between studs. Google butttaper or buttaper. Or there is a way to splice it with plywood that has shims on the two edges which actually slightly taper the butt ends. I know these exist. I have never heard f or seen anyone use them except on patches.
And is seems to me that a piece that is too short is just th same as one that is too long. You still want your butt joints staggered.
 
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