Ceiling Texture

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  #1  
Old 03-02-17, 02:29 PM
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Ceiling Texture

Hi guys,

I have to fix one of the ceiling in my house but I cannot find any tools for the texture the constructor used.
Does anyone has an idea on that?

Thanks

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Old 03-02-17, 03:06 PM
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Looks like a standard knock-down finish to me. Have you looked for that or something else?
 
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Old 03-02-17, 03:10 PM
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How big of an area do you need to texture? The original texture was sprayed on as a splatter coat, let set a little bit and then knocked down with a wide knife. How long you let it set along with how thick/thin the joint compound is determines how pronounced the texture is. While spraying is best it is possible to apply it in other ways if the area isn't too large.
 
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Old 03-02-17, 03:22 PM
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Maybe 8 inches x 8 inches
 
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Old 03-02-17, 03:26 PM
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Old 03-02-17, 03:28 PM
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I never use the spray cans of orange peel texture so I don't know if they will work with knockdown. If you go that route you'd want to use the largest setting/hole.

You can also flick mud up on the ceiling with an old brush or dab it on with a sponge prior to knocking it down. I've heard of some using scrap carpet to apply the j/c. Texturing can be messy so it pays to cover up well although errant dried mud can be dissolved with a wet rag and elbow grease.

I just watched that video and while he got good results, IMO it's easier to control the knockdown if you let the mud set a little longer. He had it real wet which means you have to be extra careful with the knife. When the mud sets a little longer it doesn't take as delicate of a touch.
 
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Old 03-02-17, 03:41 PM
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He is actually a she and her name is Jane lol
 
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Old 03-02-17, 03:43 PM
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I saw where it said 'see jane drill' but I guess it didn't register
 
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Old 03-03-17, 10:19 AM
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I get excellent results with a dash brush. You can use a stiff whisk broom. Mix up some stuff about like pancake batter. Dip the brush in and run your hand over the ends of the bristles to bend them back so when they snap back some mud flicks off onto the patch. I use setting mud either 5 minute or twenty minute depending on the size of the patch. Timing is everything. If you knock it down too soon it is too flat and the spots are too smooth and too large.
If you wait too long you have to press harder. If you use setting mud a mist of water on the trowel or knife to lubricate it makes for a smoother knock down without drag lines.
If you use regular drying mud and you try to knock it down too soon wipe it off and try again and let it dry longer. I have noticed that the field of the patch sets faster than the overspray on the painted surface. This also makes it harder to time. I don't know if regular drying mud behaves differently on paint vs. raw patch or not.
If you use drying mud you really can't go far wrong. If you are too soon then wait if too late then wet the wamm with a mister and try again. If it is really bad then scrape it off, sand and try again.
I have tried the aerosol knockdown. I likt my way better
I do use aerosol on orangepeel if the patch is small. I hav had good luck
by good luck I mean that someone walking by the patch at arm's length won't see it once it is painted to match. But I can usually find my own patch because I know where to look.
 
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Old 03-03-17, 11:33 AM
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While I rarely do so, priming the area to be textured will slow down the drying time of the texture over the patch similar to how it does over the painted area.

Most of us can tell where we've made the repairs because we know where to look. Since there really isn't any such thing as a perfect job I look for the illusion of a perfect job, basically where studying the job will reveal the defects but they are hid from casual view.
 
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Old 03-03-17, 11:55 AM
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Thinned down joint compound spit through a hopper gun hooked up to an air compressor. Both can be rented.

When taping the repair, have a large sponge to blend the joint compound into the existing texture and when ready to spray your texture feather it out from the patch by a good foot, foot and a half all around your patch.
 
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Old 03-03-17, 12:51 PM
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One thing we forgot to mention. I hope you did not learn this the hard way already. No matter what t chinquapin you use, roller, dab, flick spray
COVER EVERYTHNG. ON a patch this small I staple painters plastic to he lid to make a tent about four feet square or diameter minimum and then cover the floor below this for about four feet more all the way around.lITS ALWQYS EASIER AND CHEAPER TO COVER THAN CLEAn.
 
 

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