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Cracks appears on the four corners of the window after installing a new window

Cracks appears on the four corners of the window after installing a new window

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  #1  
Old 10-06-17, 09:18 PM
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Cracks appears on the four corners of the window after installing a new window

We replaced our old window for a new one years ago, but since then we found the wall around the window has crack and becomes larger and larger. The inside cracks on the three corner are mostly diagonal and outside crack is vertical. please see attached pic. Anyone has any idea, whether it is our window installation problem or it is foundation problem, please also see pic attached. The last pic is rotated automatically.


Thanks
Rui
 
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Last edited by PJmax; 10-07-17 at 08:58 PM. Reason: reoriented picture
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  #2  
Old 10-07-17, 01:25 AM
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not a window issue, something is going on with foundation.
 
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Old 10-07-17, 02:08 AM
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I agree and the middle pic looks like there is a possibility of moisture getting thru also.
 
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Old 10-07-17, 07:56 PM
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sorry you mean you agree that this is foundation problem? what is this moisture issue?
 
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Old 10-07-17, 08:55 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

We replaced our old window for a new one years ago
How old is "years" ago ?

In the middle picture.... the tape is coming off the wall due to it getting wet. Apparently the cracked foundation is allowing water to get into the wall.
 
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Old 10-07-17, 09:12 PM
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That's an outside wall in the 3rd pic? I've lived all up and down CA (though not in, but near, your specific location) and never saw mortar squeeze out like that left to harden. Is it common there?
 
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Old 10-07-17, 09:18 PM
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That's probably a "style" of brickwork but it sure doesn't look like it seals real well.
With that mortar hanging out it very easily can wick water in especially thru any cracks.... and not just the large visible crack.
 
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Old 10-07-17, 09:26 PM
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With that mortar hanging out it very easily can wick water in especially thru any cracks
My thoughts exactly. It would never fly in wetter parts of the country but he only gets about 16" avg per year. That's not much more than me.
 
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Old 10-07-17, 10:18 PM
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hi Peter, Thanks for comment, sorry I mean one year ago we replaced window, so you think it is a foundation problem? how this foundation underground problem can cause water into wall? not very sure
 
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Old 10-07-17, 10:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
That's an outside wall in the 3rd pic? I've lived all up and down CA (though not in, but near, your specific location) and never saw mortar squeeze out like that left to harden. Is it common there?
Hi Gunguy45

yes the 3rd pic is outside wall, we heard that if crack is vertical and from the underground up it is sort of serious and may be foundation problem
 
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Old 10-07-17, 10:26 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I agree and the middle pic looks like there is a possibility of moisture getting thru also.
Thanks, but if I understand correctly rain or water could go through crack but is it definitely related to foundation issue?
 
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Old 10-07-17, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
That's an outside wall in the 3rd pic? I've lived all up and down CA (though not in, but near, your specific location) and never saw mortar squeeze out like that left to harden. Is it common there?
this mortar style is not what we like too, but due to hot CA house market we have to live with some defects, just not thought about before the water in problem, should we just re model the whole outside wall(only one side has this style)
 
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Old 10-08-17, 06:25 AM
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The mortar squeeze style was all the rage in some neighborhoods in the 60s and early 70s.

Are there any trees nearby that might have roots that are growing under the footing? Almost looks like it's being lifted. If it's settling, i would think there should be a 2nd crack somewhere else.

Where do you live? Are you in a frost climate? And I wonder if the brick is sitting on top of that sidewalk. Frost heave might crack the brick like that, if the brick is not on a solid footing below frost. Might be taking the wall framing with it.
 
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Old 10-08-17, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
The mortar squeeze style was all the rage in some neighborhoods in the 60s and early 70s.

Are there any trees nearby that might have roots that are growing under the footing? Almost looks like it's being lifted. If it's settling, i would think there should be a 2nd crack somewhere else.

Where do you live? Are you in a frost climate? And I wonder if the brick is sitting on top of that sidewalk. Frost heave might crack the brick like that, if the brick is not on a solid footing below frost. Might be taking the wall framing with it.
Yes there is tree about 15 feet away and we can see one root is extended to house side, but the tree should be old age and also house is built in 1960s, we are not in Frost heave area(in CA, pretty dry weather), is it a foundation issue?
 
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Old 10-08-17, 02:07 PM
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I think I would probe the edge of the sidewalk and look for any signs of that tree root. A tree root exerts hydraulic pressure as it grows. Ruling out that as a possibility might take a little digging along the edge of the sidewalk but it might be worth it.

There may also be a water source the root is feeding off of... would be good to investigate.
 
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Old 10-08-17, 02:11 PM
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To clarify...YES, it's a foundation issue (as has been stated over and over). People have been asking other questions and exploring possibilities, but nothing definitive can be said as to the cause without being onsite.

Whatever the cause, you are going to need a specialist to look at it and investigate. Not Joe the handyman or even Bob the Builder, but a specialist in foundation repairs.
 
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Old 10-08-17, 04:38 PM
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Thanks, because we had some other friend checked and said the crack is not in foundation wall, so should not be a foundation issue, confused
 
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Old 10-08-17, 04:55 PM
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Well, something is causing the bricks to crack in a ever widening way, that normally means it's being lifted at the bottom and the most obvious thing is the foundation also being lifted. The fact that it appears to be affecting the inside framing and thus the sheetrock cracks also point to either it being lifted at that point or everywhere else is sagging.

Is your friend an expert on foundations and masonry? If not, his opinion is as useless as is ours, since we can't be there to inspect it personally. Fixing it now rather than later will prevent further damage and cost less.

You said a tree is 15 ft away and I think you said old? That means it must be pretty healthy and large? Trees roots grow longer and larger around until they start to die. A decent sized tree 15 ft away from a house could be a major issue depending on type. A 6-8" diameter tree (the trunk) can have small roots 20 ft away easily. As the tree ages, those roots may not grow longer but can grow bigger and deeper. I've seen pictures of roots that actually broke through the wall an a basement, the tree was about 25 ft away as I remember and hadn't been an issue for 20 yrs.

Find a specialist who can do an accurate inspection taking measurements and checking flatness. I doubt you can do this by eyeball alone.
 
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Old 10-08-17, 10:52 PM
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appreciate! will find some one to do so
 
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