drywall over drywall?

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Old 10-18-17, 10:12 AM
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drywall over drywall?

had ugly 70's paneling on walls......someone slapped wallpaper over that and painted. Under that is 1/2 drywall. I took some of the paneling off since it was easier to just rip it out- Now I am left with a room with 1/2 drywall (unfinished since panels covered it)- Rather than rip that all down- was thinking of screwing 1/4" drywall over it- This seem like an OK approach or am I missing something that may make this more work in the end......
 
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Old 10-18-17, 10:18 AM
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You will have to extend outlets or switches that are in the wall. It's not a big deal but I thought that I would mention it. Also, look at baseboard heating, if there is any. Door & window moldings will have to be adjusted too.
 
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Old 10-18-17, 11:42 AM
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You can see it and we cannot - this makes more sense than skimcoating and finishing what's there?
 
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Old 10-18-17, 11:55 AM
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well yes I think- when they put original drywall up - they did not offset any of the sheets..... (being they put panel over it) so it would be a pain to tape......
 
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Old 10-18-17, 12:08 PM
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Don't forget that bringing out the drywall will also affect how the woodwork fits, other than that and the electrical boxes there isn't any reason not to laminate over the existing drywall. One benefit of ripping it out and starting over is you can update the electrical and insulation.
 
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Old 10-18-17, 03:30 PM
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You might want to check but the only time I ever bought 1/4 drywall it was more expensive than 1/2" and certainly did not come in all the lengths that you find 1/2".
 
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Old 10-18-17, 03:32 PM
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The easiness of working with 1/4" as opposed to 1/2" is well worth the extra money.
 
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Old 10-19-17, 02:34 AM
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1/4" might cost a little more but not much. 3/8" is often priced the same as 1/2" I don't know if 1/4" comes in 12' lengths or not but usually 8' works better in an older house.
 
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Old 10-19-17, 03:33 AM
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Just an odd tip. Screen molding is about ' thick. If you add " Sheetrock you can pull window and door trim and add screen molding to the jambs. That way the Sheetrock will be flush with the edges of the jambs.

For electrical boxes you can install box extensions. They just slip in and rest against the surface of the new Sheetrock.
 
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