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How to drywall different depths flush


Bbnson25's Avatar
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01-12-18, 01:35 PM   #1 (permalink)  
How to drywall different depths flush

Hi there, I'm trying to fix an issue I have in a stairway in my house. The previous owners had some work done after a flood and had to switch the stair direction. Now I'm not sure if they did something wonky and didn't care of if it just the nature of the remodeling beast but going down the stairs along where the floor joist is there is a seam where they added a wall along the stairs and something is bowed out somewhere. At the start of the stairs there is about a 3/4" depth difference at the drywall seam. And at the end f the wall its down to a little less than 1/4". All on about an 8ft span. 'm just not sure how to take care of this issue. I've been told to double up the drywall but then I'll have the issue in the opposite direction which doesn't make sense to me. It's an unfinished basement so just open studs on the backside. Can I shim out drywall that much? Just pour drywall mud on until it looks decent? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

 
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01-12-18, 01:40 PM   #2 (permalink)  
Not certain I fully comprehend if there is no drywall now you'd fur out the studs as needed to make them all level/even. If you are trying to fix existing drywall that might be hard to accomplish. 3/4" is too thick for joint compound to be applied. You might be able to float it out some so the discrepancy isn't as noticeable.


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01-12-18, 02:35 PM   #3 (permalink)  
Sorry should have said that. There is exhisting drywall already.

Thanks.

 
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01-12-18, 03:08 PM   #4 (permalink)  
Is it possible to post a picture or two for us ? How-to-insert-pictures

It's hard to make that type of repair with sheetrock in place. It is possible to add a piece of 1/4" sheetrock and shims to bring it out level on the deeper side but that would require several different sized shims at different locations.


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01-12-18, 03:50 PM   #5 (permalink)  
You should remove the drywall and fix the framing. If the back side is open, pop the drywall loose (or unscrew it if it's screwed.) Place another stud on the back side that will push the drywall out the right amount for it to be flush.

If it can't be corrected with one stud, it could be the entire wall needs to be shimmed or rebuilt. Or possibly you can pull the nails that hold the new wall to the existing, and tweak it so that it lines up properly.

Drywall is cheap, so tear it off as needed and fix the framing.

 
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01-12-18, 04:31 PM   #6 (permalink)  
I have attached a photo, hard to get a good one in the tight space. I'll try to get another better one when there's a little better light.

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Name:  wall.jpg
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Last edited by PJmax; 01-12-18 at 06:53 PM. Reason: added 2nd enhanced picture
 
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01-12-18, 05:30 PM   #7 (permalink)  
So which wall is straight? The top wall or the bottom wall. Use a straightedge of some kind to see which is straight left to right and up and down. Tell us.

 
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01-12-18, 06:25 PM   #8 (permalink)  
It's the bottom wall that's all wonky. Top wall seems pretty square

 
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01-12-18, 06:53 PM   #9 (permalink)  
Interesting the way the steps are under the upper wall.


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01-12-18, 10:04 PM   #10 (permalink)  
I'm not sure what you mean by the steps being under the upper wall. Sorry I'm still pretty new to this stuff this is my first house and I'm still learning every day. I'm not sure I have many options here other than redoing or moving the bottom wall which I don't think is much of an option for me. I was thinking what if I do knock the drywall loose and basically sister some 2x4 pieces to the existing studs but bump them out wherever they need to be to do a decent taping job. Basically what xsleeper suggested, but it'll have to be on basically every stud, or maybe this is exactly what he meant? Is there any taboo in adding to the existing studs like that just for better drywall placement?

 
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01-13-18, 04:09 AM   #11 (permalink)  
I'd remove the handrail and the bottom drywall, shim or sister the studs so everything lines up and hang new drywall on the bottom portion.


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01-13-18, 06:38 AM   #12 (permalink)  
I'd look at finishing out the seam with some wood/trim and just leave the offset alone.

 
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01-13-18, 10:44 AM   #13 (permalink)  
What about cutting the nails on the top plate of the lower walls that hold the wall vertical, then banging the wall straight and re-nailing? If the stairs are plumb, it looks like the wall is closer to the lower steps than it is to the upper steps. May just be a crooked wall as opposed top a wonky one.

 
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