Closing up an interior opening


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Old 01-27-18, 12:48 PM
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Closing up an interior opening

I'd like to close up an interior opening (no glass) in the wall between a second floor bedroom and the living room (vaulted ceilings). It was put in when the condo was constructed, but its just annoying as it allows noise from the living down below to get into the bedroom easily, and vice versa The opening is about 30" square, and has drywall along all four inside edges. I was just going to frame it along the edges with 2x4s (and one in the middle), then screw 1/2" drywall panels on both sides, tape, mud and texture. Just wondering if I should leave that edge drywall there in the opening, and nail the new 2x4 framing on top of it, or should I remove it all and nail the new 2x4s directly on top of the existing 2x4s. Or something else? Trying to minimize time and dust, so it seems that going directly on the drywall might be better in that regard. But I don't want to do that if there are some unforseen headaches with doing it that way. thanks for the help.
 
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Old 01-27-18, 12:51 PM
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I'd remove the drywall return along with the corner bead then frame it up and hang the drywall. Having drywall sandwiched between 2 studs won't be very secure. The corner bead can cause a hump where the new drywall meets.
 
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Old 01-27-18, 01:36 PM
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Great! Makes sense. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-27-18, 02:57 PM
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Remove corner beads and scrape back some of the excess joint compound. Remove the drywall from the short sides of the opening, it will be easier for you to line up the lumber when you have the exposed lumber of the wall as a reference. Then your framing plan will work.
 
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Old 01-28-18, 09:12 AM
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Trying to minimize time and dust
Why not close only one side and make the other (bedroom) side a book shelf? You could trim the outside to look like a false "window" or "picture frame" and not have to mud, texture and paint.

Also look into whether the opening provides a return path for heating /cooling in the bedroom. You might have to undercut the door to allow enough air flow for proper heating/cooling. (assuming you have forced air system.)
 
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Old 01-29-18, 06:54 AM
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Personally, I would install a window.
 
 

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