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New drywall when the ABS drain pipe is not flush with the studs?

New drywall when the ABS drain pipe is not flush with the studs?

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  #1  
Old 04-08-18, 01:43 AM
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New drywall when the ABS drain pipe is not flush with the studs?

hello!

so short story, there was a leak from the shower above, so all the drywall and insulation was removed by a mitigation company. now i have to put it back. i didn't really get a good look at the previous drywall before the mitigation company removed it. so now i'm looking for any help/suggestions.

basically the ABS drain pipe is not flush with the studs. it's probably a good 1/4 to 1/2 inch at the very bottom to about almost flush to 1/8 inch sticking out at the top.

i believe in the past, the they stopped the drywall on both sides of the ABS pipe. this won't be a problem with the bottom 40.5" inches of drywall because it will be covered by the base cabinet of the sink.

i'm looking for help/suggestions for the rest of the drywall that is going to be above the 40.5" mark (about the height of the future back splash).

1) do i just drywall over and accept a bulge ?
2) ??

as always, thanks for any help/suggestions

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Last edited by PJmax; 04-08-18 at 06:42 PM. Reason: cropped/enlarged pic
  #2  
Old 04-08-18, 02:12 AM
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It looks like a small wall so you could rip some 1 1/2 strips of plywood, !/2" thick. add those to the studs and then add the drywall.
 
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Old 04-08-18, 04:01 AM
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I agree furring out the wall would look best. You'll also need box extenders for the electrical unless you remount them. Another option would be to back cut the drywall where the pipe is although would make the drywall weaker in that area.
 
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Old 04-08-18, 10:06 AM
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thanks for the idea ! so would you guys recommend furring out with plywood: 1) the entire height of the stud?, 2) just the stud to the left of the ABS drain pipe, or 3) the entire wall?

thanks!
 
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Old 04-08-18, 10:11 AM
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I would do the whole wall that will stop any chance of a hump in wall, also I would fur the whole stud. Just easier and no chance of putting screw where furring strip is missing.
 
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Old 04-08-18, 10:25 AM
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It's best to fur out the entire stud. Doesn't matter if you use plywood or ripped down lumber as long as it brings the entire wall's studs out to the same level.
 
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Old 04-08-18, 06:14 PM
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What they said. And one more thing. keep that picture and add measurements where the pipes are. DO NOT PUT A SCREW INTO THE PIPES OR WIRES.
 
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Old 04-08-18, 06:46 PM
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A picture of the wall is a great idea for future reference.

I'd still put nail plates over any stud where a screw could cause damage.... especially where the horizontal vent line runs thru the studs. You can find them in the electrical aisle at the home goods stores.

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Old 04-08-18, 07:29 PM
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They carry bigger (longer) nail plates in the plumbing section too.
 
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Old 04-08-18, 07:55 PM
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Looking at the bottom plate, I would not assume that you need to shim out every stud 1/2"... it kind of looks offset. The only way to know for sure is to run a string line across the wall.

Drive a 16d nail part of the way in on the far left stud and on the far right stud. Wrap a string around each nail so that the ends are 1/2" off the stud. The measure the distance from each stud to the string. If the distance is 1/2" everywhere, then yes... you would add 1/2" to each stud.

The clean out plug on your 4" pipe should remain accessible. You will want to put a clean out cover over the access hole after the drywall is finished.
 
 

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