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Plywood instead of drywall for walls/ceiling

Plywood instead of drywall for walls/ceiling


  #1  
Old 07-19-18, 05:05 PM
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Plywood instead of drywall for walls/ceiling

The house I just got is wall to wall goofy paneling, some has drywall behind and some not. There's a drop ceiling everywhere which I'd just assume get rid off. So basically, gut each room, deal with whatever insulation/electrical problems I find, and reinstall the room. How hard could it be?

Wondering if anyone's done plywood for walls/ceiling. I've got the perfect tools for woodworking this job and have built a lot of plywood gadgets/furniture over the last few years. When I had an apartment, I double walled it with plywood and screwed to it everything I cared about (wiring, shelves, sorters, appliances, computer & monitors, etc). I'd like to carry over that "style", although if pockmarked with screwholes fixing it up to sell would be a bit of a do. Or not, if I can unscrew the floor runners to replace the sheet...

To see what I'm talking about an image search for plywood walls might shed light. I've looked around for other drywall alternatives, but I keep coming back to plywood. I do not have an attached garage but understand I have more fire code research to do.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 12:19 AM
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Wondering if anyone's done plywood for walls/ceiling.

Well, if your into that 70's look then it will be ok,

Honestly I think that would kill any resale potential and would look pretty bad.

Take one room at a time and drywall, in the end you will be glad you did.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 03:34 AM
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Besides, the cost of plywood vs drywall seems excessive. Also one of the pluses about drywall is the ability to open it up and easy repair. Not so with plywood. True you can mount almost anything, anywhere with plywood, but with proper planning so can you with wall board. Plus drywall is fire rated as an interior wall product. I'm not so sure about plywood. It could affect insurance rates or possible claim if fire were occur.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 03:49 AM
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With drywall you can easily hide every seam and nail/screw. And as Norm pointed out repairs are a LOT easier. I can see plywood walls in a garage/shop but it's not something I'd want for walls inside my house.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 03:52 AM
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Where I am what you propose is against fire code.
It would fail if inspected or an insurance claim for fire would be denied.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 04:06 AM
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also, wood walls tend to make for a noisier room.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 05:10 AM
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I'll take the plywood side of the argument.

In my previous home I added a stub wall with a pocket door to enclose the kitchen. Using plywood on the pocket door frame made that wall substantially stronger and it would resist movement far better than drywall. I did cover the plywood with vinyl-covered paneling so there was no problem with the seam in the plywood as well as the paneling nails actually held the paneling, something they won't do in drywall.

In my current home I have plywood on both sides of a wall separating my second bathroom from the adjacent bedroom. I'll use tile or solid surfacing material on the tub side and vinyl wallpaper elsewhere in the bathroom and a drywall surface over the ply in the bedroom. The plywood is for structural strength as well as noise control.

The additional cost for the ply rather than drywall is, in my opinion, not really an issue for a single build. If you were a contractor building hundreds of houses it would a major issue. I cannot address anything concerning fire ratings and building codes. I'd rather prevent fires in my home than have it built with fire-resistant, yet structurally materials.

Being able to drive a screw into the plywood and have it actually support/hold something is a huge asset to me. As for the " 70's look" I build to suit ME, not some "designer" that changes his/her mind every few years. One of my least favorite phrases is, "It's so dated!" Who cares if it is a design from more than a few months ago as long as the person living there likes it?
 
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Old 07-20-18, 09:22 AM
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Wondering if anyone's done plywood for walls/ceiling
I dont think anybody is arguing the use of plywood in a house for structural or strength requirements.

I'm assuming the OP was looking to install plywood for ceilings & walls throughout the entire house as a complete substitute for drywall!
 
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Old 09-30-18, 11:03 AM
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Thanks for the inputs on this. My jury is still out.
Indeed the plan is for plywood throughout the house.
As noted, fire code is still a consideration.
Aesthetic considerations and resale... I'll keep quiet, it's a whole separate rant. As for "the 70's look", as I'd mentioned an image search, it isn't all garages and treehouses. See also 30x40 Workshop on Youtube.
 
 

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