Framing walls on the 2nd floor


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Old 10-22-18, 10:14 AM
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Framing walls on the 2nd floor

Hi,

I am a newbie to framing/construction, and I need advice . I am planning to add 2 rooms upstairs, but not sure if I can attach the top plates to trusses/beam at the locations specified (see photo). The highest span is 11' 1.5'', if that helps. Also, do I need to plan on a double top plate or a single one since they are not load bearing walls? Thank you for your help/advice!

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Last edited by PJmax; 10-29-18 at 05:31 PM. Reason: enlarged picture
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Old 10-23-18, 06:17 AM
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Put horizontal backing (a 2x4 laid flat) between rafters, then mount your walls to those 2x4s. That gives you backing for ceiling drywall on both sides of your walls. Double top plates aren't necessary per se but does give you better nailing for drywall.
 
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Old 10-23-18, 06:36 AM
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Don't understand your layout. What direction are the walls that will contain the doors to the 2 rooms, parallel or perpendicular to the roof rafters? Also, if there are walls parallel to the floor joists, they should set on top of the floor joist or bridging should be added between the adjacent floor joists. Are there other ridge beam supports like the one in the picture and are you planning on leaving them in place?
 
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Old 10-23-18, 09:58 AM
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Thanks for your suggestion; that makes a lot of sense. Do I need to leave some space between the insulation and the ceiling for venting, or should I frame ceiling for the rooms below the rafters?
 
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Old 10-23-18, 10:02 AM
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The door openings will be perpendicular to the rafters. Yes, I am planning to put the walls on top of the floor joists. There is only one ridge support, so is it ok for me to nail a top plate to it?
 
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Old 10-23-18, 01:41 PM
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Ventilation is above the insulation, not below. They make Styrofoam chutes for this purpose.
 
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Old 10-23-18, 04:16 PM
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Yes, I realize that. But if I put styrofoam chutes, how is the air going to move laterally? Wouldn't it be blocked by rafters' plywood insets?
 
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Old 10-23-18, 04:44 PM
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Ventilation is bottom to top in each rafter bay... not laterally!
 
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Old 10-23-18, 05:32 PM
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Still confused about your layout. I'm assuming your house is a cape cod. The second floor rooms are usually one to the right of the stairwell and one to the left. The room doors are parallel to the roof rafters and located in the walls running the width of the second floor. What is the span between opposite roof rafters at a height of 8 feet? This is the maximum width of your flat ceiling unless you make the wall height less than 8 high but high enough to trim the door frame.
 
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Old 10-23-18, 06:30 PM
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I wouldn't assume that they want a flat 8' ceiling.
 
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Old 10-24-18, 09:42 AM
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Oh, ok, I did not know that, thanks.
 
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Old 10-24-18, 10:09 AM
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beelzebob's questions

I am going to follow the attic expansion example in the picture. The highest point of the ceiling is 11 feet and some inches, and the lowest is around 6 feet. Also, I was planning on vaulted ceilings. I hope this helps.
 
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Old 10-29-18, 01:28 PM
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I have a new challenge now . How do I go about framing a "sub" ceiling if I don't want to attach insulation directly to the rafters? The rafter pitch is approx. 9 1/2 inches, and it will not accommodate both R38 insulation and baffles. So, should I install rafter ties to lower the ceiling, or frame "sub" ceiling directly underneath existing rafters. Any ideas?
 
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Old 10-29-18, 04:11 PM
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Personally, i would rip 1" or 1 1/2" or 2" foam down and make your own baffle by using the top chord of the i joists.... put the foam on that... about 1 1/2" below the roof decking. That might give you enough r value along with thinner insulation. If not then add 2x2 sleepers onto your I joists. Put your insulation on that.
 
 

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