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Plastering brick wall - partial hard plaster

Plastering brick wall - partial hard plaster

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  #1  
Old 07-30-19, 01:13 PM
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Plastering brick wall - partial hard plaster

So I have an old house with an internal brick wall thatís has hard plaster directly applied to it.

i was planning on skimming the old plaster (which I am for the entire house), however, the hard plaster in the bathroom already on the bricks was a bit weak in adhesion at the bottom of the wall, so decided to pull it away from the wall (which came off relatively easily).

The hard plaster at the middle and top of the wall is pretty solidly attached and also donít really want to attempt to remove it if I can leave it on.

questions is what does everyone recommend to get this wall finished to a flat finished standard?

i was thinking of either:
1. Dot and dab plasterboard onto brick wall at the bottom only, and the replastering entire wall, (skimming the top), and plastering bottom.
2. Attach furring strips to brick wall at the bottom, and attach plasterboard with screws, the skimming, top of wall, and plastering bottom
3. Remove all the hard plaster - and either dot and dab and replastering, or furring strips and replaster.

What does everyone recommend?

please keep in mind, Iím not a professional, this is the first time Iím refurbish an entire house, but I know how to plaster and skim, just not sure what best option in terms of ensuring minimising issues during plaster wall, vs time it all takes to sort out.

the bricks behind the hard plaster seems decent enough and mortar looks like itís pretty solid still despite house age.

will try attach pictures shortly
 
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  #2  
Old 07-30-19, 01:46 PM
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Old 07-31-19, 10:14 AM
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Since you know how to plaster why not just plaster it? Clean the bricks well with a wire brush to get the old plaster dust and loose mortar out then plaster it to the same thickness as what's left. Use the existing plaster to screed off of. Then finish the whole wall.
Try another approach to show us the picture.
If there is nothing to inhibit a bond to the brick just plaster. If in doubt use a bonding agent.
Since it is the bottom of the wall that is loose make sure any water infiltration is eliminated. What kind of footing does this wall sit on? You might have a problem with rising damp. Look for Preservation Brief 21 https://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-prese...at-plaster.htm for some additional information.
 
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Old 08-05-19, 02:08 AM
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I’ve only just learnt to plaster on plasterboard, and haven’t plastered direct to brick before... so reason why I want to avoid plastering using hard plaster.

Brick wall is on first floor, sitting on concrete foundation as far as I am aware.

im think I’m going to dot and dab moisture board onto wall, and the plaster and blend in with top have skimmed. Even though I know how to plaster I am by no means an experienced plasterer, but can do a new plasterboarded wall, with no issues.
 
  #5  
Old 08-05-19, 04:24 PM
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A couple things you might need to be aware of, this advice is worth what you pay for it:
The old brick might have a lot of suction, that is it might draw all the moisture out of the plaster before you get the board positioned and not bond to the board and not let the dots squish to let you get the board straight and flat.
So just to make sure before you do your installation mix up a little of your mortar and put it on the brick just as if you were going to stick the board. See how long it remains pliable and then interpolate the time for one or two dots compared to the time you think it will take to do the whole board. If there is enough time fine If not then wet the wall down to kill some of that suction and allow more time. Once you complete your experiment knock the test dot(s) off. Were I doing it this way I would leave the board a little shy of flush with the existing plaster so you can fill up to it and get it perfectly flush with your plaster. If you use board I think you should tape the joint. Some people argue against this.

Come back when you get it done and tell us how it went.
 
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