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How to tell if these posts are load bearing?

How to tell if these posts are load bearing?

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  #1  
Old 10-13-19, 08:33 AM
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How to tell if these posts are load bearing?

My wife hates these posts between our living and dining room and wants them out. How do I tell if they're load bearing? Am thinking the walls in either side support the load of the beam above?

Load bearing https://imgur.com/gallery/byo0Emp

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Last edited by PJmax; 10-13-19 at 11:36 AM. Reason: added pics from link
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  #2  
Old 10-13-19, 10:22 AM
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Normally those are decorative and not load bearing.
 
  #3  
Old 10-13-19, 11:38 AM
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Look below the pillars. There would have to be additional framing under them.
I agree with Mark..... very doubtful they're load bearing.
 
  #4  
Old 10-13-19, 12:59 PM
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I also doubt that they are load bearing.

Is the base on top of the hardwood.
Does the top have gyprock above it?

If yes then odds are high that they are just decorative.
If they were load bearing then they should have been installed before the hardwood and the gyprock.
 
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Old 10-13-19, 01:24 PM
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Ok thanks all. I removed the trim from around the bottom and found there is no hardware floor underneath. The posts extend to the subflooring. So I think that kinda seals it for us as it would be a PIA to find matching Hardwood floor to patch it.
 
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Old 10-20-19, 03:59 PM
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Looking at how much wall you have above them, going across the room, It just looks a typical job where someone created a more open floor plan by using 2 pillars and a beam across, to replace a load bearing wall. I know several people who have this setup, even though in their case the pillars are walls extending into the room.

Example of the procedure

You could go to the city hall and find out if maybe they permitted this type of work on your house in the past.
 
  #7  
Old 10-20-19, 06:03 PM
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This suggestion is for your wife not you because odds atr that you will not approve as it means just one extra job for you.

You could cover them in so they look like two short walls.
You should not have to make them too much larger depending on how much is just trim.
Hard to tell the distance from the column to the door but if it is decent then you could put a bookshelf from the column to the door and hide the column is that then match it on the other side.

Happy Carpentry!!!
Remember "Happy wife , happy life "usually means happy wife, busy husband,
 
  #8  
Old 10-22-19, 06:12 AM
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Not to hijack this thread;
I just want to ask if some homes built in the 1950s could have been built with only joists for support along with stud walls in center of basement as opposed to an I-beam?
 
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