Question about dry wall aplication

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Old 03-23-20, 01:56 PM
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Question about dry wall aplication

I am removing the ceiling. Re-doing some of the plumbing and pipes which will run along the joist and then pop out of the ceiling and run along the "ceiling" ( I want to avoid drilling through the joist if possible.)
My question is. If My plumbing is sticking out in areas the ceiling will be, running for 10' at a time.
Do I first need to install the dry wall or can I do all my plumbing first than the dry wall folks will figure out how to cut and work the ceiling back onto place even if pipes are sticking out?
I want to do this in stages and hope I can come back a few months later to do dry wall after the plumbing is done? Again, the plumbing is not all sealed inside the ceiling, it will need to traverse over new dry wall.
Thanks.
 
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Old 03-23-20, 03:07 PM
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My plumbing is sticking out in areas the ceiling will be, running for 10' at a time.
Meaning the plumbing will be exposed?
 
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Old 03-23-20, 04:10 PM
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Yes, in certain sections my option is to drill through joist and run in through the perpendicular wood, or to expose the pipe and run it along the ceiling surface. Kinda like a detour.
I am not clear on how to put the ceiling in if I do the plumbing first? Maybe there is some way as I know nothing about dry wall. I will hire some help on the dry wall, just wanted to ask here first.
 
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Old 03-23-20, 04:37 PM
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This is America, anything is possible, including running pipes through the ceiling joists, for a price. And the price to cut and fit the drywall around the pipes will be costly too. and I can picture how they could be only half buried. If it has to be done this way try to lay out the plumbing so that the cuts in the drywall can be nice and even from the ends or edges of the the drywall. Don't make it more complicated than it needs to be.
 
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Old 03-23-20, 04:48 PM
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Is this a considered finished living space? If so, not only will it be an eyesore but I doubt it would be up to code. In any case, I have to agree with "tightcoat", dry wall installers are going to charge extra for all the cutting/fitting they will have to do. Especially, on a ceiling. Maybe you could consider making some type of soffit to hide the exposed pipes.
 
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Old 03-23-20, 05:21 PM
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Not a living space, it's a garage. I am more worried about the execution and order than trying to make it eye pleasing, currently all the pipes hang from the ceiling, so tucking 80% of them up in the ceiling is going to be a big improvement. I may even consider creating the channel through the joist, that is not that expensive to do just no happy about drilling more holes, as you know conduit is routed already through the joist. But I have room to drill em out. So maybe I will just go for it.
I had an idea, using shark bit fitting, when it's time to dry wall, detach the pipes, cut 4 holes in the drywall, mount it, than sweat the copper back on for lasting seal. Might actually work?
 
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Old 03-23-20, 05:37 PM
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If it's only one pipe, I wouldn't worry too much about it. I'd support it as minimally as possible, maybe every 6-8' with a hanger that drops down from the joist - and leave the pipe a good 1-1.5" from the joists. It's much easier to cut around 2 or 3 hangers than 10. Once the drywall is finished, you can then properly support it.

I've done the Sharkbite idea too. Had to have a number of joists in the basement sistered and needed to cut the plumbing lines hanging from the joists. Instead of being without water for a week or two, I used a long piece of PEX and a pair of SharkBite connectors to run the pipe down and back up, staying out of the way of the joists in question. Then properly re-attached the copper piping once it was all done.
 
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Old 03-23-20, 11:40 PM
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To help visualize the scenario I put together this render. You can see the joist I am routing under inside of going through them.. Just two 1/2" cold and hot water lines. In this image these are not to scale but close enough for my needs. There is no ceiling now but eventually I want to finish it off with new dry wall and tuck it all up there.
 
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Old 03-24-20, 04:46 AM
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Just build a sofit around the pipes in that general area!
 
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Old 03-24-20, 09:00 AM
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What is the function of a soft? Is it just so you don't see the pipes?
 
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Old 03-24-20, 10:38 AM
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As long as there's 3/4" or so between the joist and those pipes, I don't see why any drywaller couldn't just slip a sheet between the joist and pipes. Then use straps or some other hanger to support the pipes onto the drywall.

It'll take a few minutes more to mud the seams in that area, but I can't imagine it being much more time consuming or expensive. I think you're over-complicating the problem.

It sounds like you're not all that worried about aethstetics as it's a basement/utility type room. You could always re-route the pipes if you really wanted a project... but I don't see the need.
 
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