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Do you follow the level of your ceiling when hanging drywall on your walls?

Do you follow the level of your ceiling when hanging drywall on your walls?

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Old 04-11-20, 11:06 AM
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Do you follow the level of your ceiling when hanging drywall on your walls?

Just finished putting drywall on my ceiling and now it's time to hang the walls. My wall length is 10' 6" so I'll be hanging the drywall horizontally across my studs. My ceiling is off level just a little, do I push the drywall up flush against my ceiling and have no gap on top, or should I keep the drywall level going across the wall and show a little gap on top?
 
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Old 04-11-20, 11:11 AM
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Generally you shove it up tight so that any gap is behind the baseboard at the bottom. If its so extreme that the sides of the sheet are so far out of plumb that you can't screw both sheets to the same stud, you would likely want to cut a taper on the top sheet to keep the sides plumb and the bottom edge level.

Any gaps 1/8" or more should get prefilled with 5 or 20 minute mud after you finish hanging and before you tape.

What is your wall height?
 
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Old 04-11-20, 03:01 PM
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My wall height is 8' and 10' 6" in length so it'll only take 2 sheets to cover it. The ceiling isn't that far out of level, around a 1/8 inch, just wasn't sure if I should follow my ceiling line and trim the sides or put it up level with the gap on the top in case I run into that problem again in another room.
One more thing, I've heard different stories about hanging drywall on your walls, some say glue and screw it on to help prevent screw pops, and others say forget the glue and just screw it on, any suggestions?
 
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Old 04-11-20, 03:11 PM
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1/8" is nothing to worry about. Shove it as tight as you can. All gluing does is reduce the amount of screwing and mudding needed. Nails pop. Screws don't really pop unless you drove the screw too deep to begin with, in which case you need to learn to set the screws properly.

I never glue anything. Big crews that need to hang a lot of rock in a day use glue. Is it better? That's debatable.
 
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Old 04-12-20, 02:50 AM
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The main advantage to using drywall adhesive is being able to use less screws/nails making finishing a little easier/quicker. Like X, I rarely ever glue the drywall to the studs.
 
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Old 04-13-20, 07:42 AM
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When I hang my drywall around my windows and doors do I just bring it to the edge of the rough in stud opening?
 
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Old 04-13-20, 10:25 AM
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Yes, you'd then shim the window jamb as/if needed. That along with the window casing will hide the cut edge .... or did you want a drywall return at the window?
 
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Old 04-13-20, 10:48 AM
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Yes. And you need to insulate the window perimeter.
 
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Old 04-14-20, 06:59 AM
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I'll be putting window jams on, also I intend to insulate around the widows as soon as I find out how to attach them to my interior framing studs, the windows are only held in by the outside nail trim. Can't find anything in the instructions, there has to be somehow to nail the window from the inside to securely hold it in, I can't believe that plastic nail trim is the only thing you need to hold these windows from coming out. I have Anderson series 2 windows...
 
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Old 04-14-20, 07:34 AM
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I am not familiar with Anderson windows and their nail trim.
Odds are though that is s all you need.
Insulate around them with foam just be sure it is the door and window type as other types expand too much and can push the windows frames in.

At least that is what I did with Jeld-Wen vinyl windows.

You should be able to find install directions for them on their website or on the net just to be sure.
 
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Old 04-14-20, 07:49 AM
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You need to install the extension jamb to the window with pocket screws. Usually best done before the window is put in. You need a 6" long bit to do it now. Once it's screwed to the window you shim it to the rough opening... Make sure it's straight, tgen use finish nails to fasten it to the rough opening as needed.
 
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