Should I stagger drywall seams?

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Old 04-23-20, 12:43 PM
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Should I stagger drywall seams?

I'm horizontally hanging drywall on a wall that's going to take 4 sheets, 2 top, 2 bottom. Should I end the drywall sheets on the same stud and have a butt joint from my ceiling to the floor, or should I stagger the seams so I don't have 1 long butt joint going from top to bottom.
Also should I leave a little gap from my ceiling drywall to the wall, or is it alright to run your ceiling drywall tight against the wood?
 
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Old 04-23-20, 12:55 PM
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Should always stager rock boards and tight to the top, any gap would go to the bottom behind the trim!
 
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Old 04-24-20, 01:10 AM
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Ceiling drywall goes all the way to the wall but the fasteners stop about a foot away with the edges being supported by the drywall on the wall. I can't see your wall to propose something else but yes, generally speaking, floor to ceiling butt joints are to be avoided.
 
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Old 04-24-20, 07:47 AM
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Thank you, I'll stagger my joints.
Had another quick question, can you put a butt joint against a factory tapered end? Sometimes I have cut pieces that will fit into a spot I need, only problem is I'll have a butt joint against a tapered end, should I just cut a new board and keep them butt against butt and tapered against tapered?
 
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Old 04-24-20, 08:08 AM
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Sure you can, nothing ever fits standard size boards, lots of trimming, it just makes for a wider joint to blend out the slightly higher seam!
 
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Old 04-24-20, 10:50 AM
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You generally want to keep butt to butt and tapered to tapered. They call taper-butt joints "basturd" joints. (If I spell it correctly it edits it out.) It's basically worse than a butt joint because you have to prefill the tapered side and fill it up before you tape it... Then you have another wide butt joint to finish.

You never want to create a butt joint where you could have a taper-taper joint. Sure you "could" but it's unnecessary. Drywall is cheap... Time and labor to finish is not. If you are doing it yourself, its really up to you. I would throw drywall away before I do very many of those.

Sometimes framing layouts make it necessary on ceilings but that's about the only place it needs to happen.

The biggest mistake people make hanging drywall is creating seams right at the corners of the doorways.
 
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Old 04-25-20, 04:09 AM
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I'll keep them butt to butt and tapered to tapered unless I absolutely have to use one in a small area somewhere, I've been avoiding seams at the corners of my doorways and windows, thanks.
Any advice on wet shimming to fill any little bows I find in studs or do you prefer the cardboard strip shims?
 
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Old 04-25-20, 08:02 AM
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Cardboard shims work fine. Don't use a longer piece than needed.. Check studs with a long straightedge. A 4" rip of 3/4 plywood 8ft long for example. If it's less than 1/8 don't worry about it.
 
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