Drywalling new detached garage

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Old 06-20-20, 11:17 AM
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Drywalling new detached garage

I am going to be installing drywall in a new 16' x 22' garage and it will have 9' high walls. I have a couple of questions and would greatly appreciate any answers that could be provided by those knowledgeable with installing drywall.

My questions are:
  1. Would it be best to wait a certain period of time for the garage foundation to settle before installing and mudding any drywall?
  1. After the drywall is installed I intend to paint it, but it could be a few months before this happens. Could the drywall sealer be applied, without having mudded the drywall, right after the drywall is installed and then mud the seams/paint the walls when I am able to?

Thank you.
 
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06-20-20, 11:49 AM
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If your foundation is settling you have problems. No you don't need to wait.

For 9 ft walls, you use 54" wide sheets of drywall, also known as "stretchboard".

it doesnt matter how long you wait, so no, the drywall does not need to be sealed. Drywall sometimes sits in warehouses for years before it goes to a job.

After you finish the joints, you prime it, then paint it. The amount of time it takes to do any of those steps is pretty much irrelevant.
 
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Old 06-20-20, 11:49 AM
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If your foundation is settling you have problems. No you don't need to wait.

For 9 ft walls, you use 54" wide sheets of drywall, also known as "stretchboard".

it doesnt matter how long you wait, so no, the drywall does not need to be sealed. Drywall sometimes sits in warehouses for years before it goes to a job.

After you finish the joints, you prime it, then paint it. The amount of time it takes to do any of those steps is pretty much irrelevant.
 
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Old 06-20-20, 11:50 AM
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Absolutist no reason to wait or do it now,what ever works with the schedule!
 
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Old 06-20-20, 12:34 PM
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Hello XSleeper. Thank you very much for providing answers to my questions.
 
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Old 06-21-20, 04:16 AM
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I agree.
It doesn't hurt the drywall to go unsealed although once it's taped/finished it's a good idea to paint it. Unpainted joint compound [especially the tape] tends to absorb moisture and can fail although that does takes years.
 
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Old 06-21-20, 09:40 AM
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I would not drywall right down to the concrete as it can wick up moisture.
 
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Old 06-21-20, 01:30 PM
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I never let sheetrock touch the floor no matter if it's wood or concrete. With a concrete floor I keep it off so the water vapor can dissipate into the room. If it were trapped in the sheetrock it might foster mold. I also like a nice gap in case there is a water leak. Keeping the sheetrock up a 1/4" can prevent a puddle from reaching it.
 
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Old 06-22-20, 02:42 AM
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A scrap piece of drywall works great [also handy] as a spacer for drywall over concrete. Baseboard works well to hide the gap.
 
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Old 06-22-20, 10:19 AM
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Hello Marksr,
Thank you for all of your advice. I shall utilize all of it as I do my drywall project.
 
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Old 06-22-20, 10:23 AM
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Hello Pilot Dane,
Thank you for your advice. I shall incorporate it as I do my drywall project.
 
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Old 06-22-20, 10:26 AM
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Hello XSleeper,
No foundation issues, as garage has yet to be constructed. I used the wrong terminology. Kinda of meant to say something like' "should I wait a bit for things to sit for awhile before applying and finishing drywall."
 
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Old 06-22-20, 10:55 AM
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When a new home is constructed the drywall goes up shortly after the framing and mechanicals are done. If you have a decent foundation and decent framing you shouldn't have any issues.
 
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