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Redoing bathroom. Take down walls or greenboard over

Redoing bathroom. Take down walls or greenboard over

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  #1  
Old 06-24-20, 05:47 AM
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Redoing bathroom. Take down walls or greenboard over

I'm redoing a bathroom in my house that's quite old. With everyone making the respirator industry void of any respirators, taking down the walls will be very difficult with all the dust. Can/should, I put green board over the current board that are there? I made a small hole in a board to see what it is. It's a board that has brown fiber on the back of it and feels very light when you tap on it. It's definitely not sheetrock. The bottom of the wall has thin plastic tile on it that I can probably scrape off and leave the glue that was used will still be attached to the board.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-24-20, 05:52 AM
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Green board isn't necessary. Normally primed and coated with a latex enamel is all the moisture protection bath rm walls/ceiling need. Some of the issues from laminating over what you have are needing extensions for electrical boxes and the door trim needing to be alter. The fact that the door likely swings in further restricts how far it can open. Will there be enough room behind the commode?
 
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  #3  
Old 06-24-20, 06:00 AM
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The problem is really the plastic tile on the bottom half. It's awful. I would just paint over it all! When I take a tile off, there's impossible to remove glue. It's a small bathroom, but there's no electric boxes in the walls except for a light above the sink/vanity. Door swing should be fine. It will cut into the molding though by the door. I would remove the baseboard and replace that. Behind the toilet. not sure. That may be an issue. I will be replacing the toilet though.

If there's a way to cover the glue behind the tile, without taking down a thing, I'd be all for it. I'm sure I could remove all the tile. Any suggestions?
 
  #4  
Old 06-24-20, 06:06 AM
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Big question is, any water damage. If so in the long run better to remove and do it right!
 
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Old 06-24-20, 06:11 AM
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There shouldn't be any water damage anywhere.
 
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Old 06-24-20, 06:14 AM
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I'm thinking you might have cellotex on the walls. Can you fashion a makeshift mask good enough for gutting the room? You'll end up with a nicer job that way.
 
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Old 06-24-20, 06:36 AM
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Looking up that board, it may just be that. I did order an asbestos test kit. Would it be necessary in this case? As far as masks go, I have the fabric, two layer, masks people are wearing. When I gutted another bathroom, it was plaster and I had crap coming out of my nose for weeks even with a respirator. I may be able to secure an N95 mask or two.
 
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Old 06-24-20, 06:52 AM
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Drywall and cellotex isn't as bad as plaster but it's still messy.
 
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Old 06-24-20, 07:07 AM
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I forgot I have masks at work. I have a choice between these three. The 3M one says for fumes. Nothing about dust.


 
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Old 06-24-20, 07:23 AM
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The one that says particulate is for dust although any of them should work.
 
  #11  
Old 06-26-20, 01:36 PM
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I would never cover anything already there. I would rip everything down to the studs and start all over. In an old bathroom there is guaranteed to be mold somewhere and you want to get all that old stuff out of there. As they say, do it right the first time. I saw someone else say you don't need greenboard. greenboard is only $2 more at most. Please spend the extra money and do the best possible job. You will be happier in the long run.
 
  #12  
Old 06-26-20, 02:14 PM
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It isn't about the cost savings. Greenboard is impregnated with a wax like substance that repels water but it also makes it harder for paint to adhere well.
 
  #13  
Old 06-26-20, 02:35 PM
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Another vote here for ripping the walls out and putting up fresh moisture resistant sheetrock. You'll also be able to renew or relocate old electrical.
 
  #14  
Old 06-29-20, 10:29 AM
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I'm gonna take it all down. There's no electrical in the walls. The switch is on the outside of the bathroom. One switch for all lights. I guess I could rewire and create three separate switches for vent, vanity, and ceiling, but it's not really a big deal for me. I'm ok with one switch for everything.

I have a question about the old, hexagon floor tile in the bathroom. Should I ask it here or create another thread?
 
  #15  
Old 06-29-20, 08:06 PM
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Tile forum for tile questions.............
 
  #16  
Old 06-30-20, 04:28 AM
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I have to agree with those that say tare down to studs.
What's the deal with green board? Are you also going to redo the bath/shower/sink? Use cement board where water is involved. Green board OK for other areas of bath. If room is problem reverse the door swing to open out instead of in.
 
  #17  
Old 06-30-20, 05:16 AM
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Mold resistant drywall is also better in bathrooms than green board, so that is why you would use a tile backer board (of any type) in a wet location like a shower, then switch to mold resistant drywall in all non wet locations in the bathroom. Green board has largely been made obsolete. I dont know why anyone would use it.
 
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Old 07-01-20, 04:50 AM
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Already decided to go down to the studs.

Not sure if I'm going to take out the tub or not yet. It could be done last and separately if I choose to do so. On those walls it will probably be Kerdi board rather than cement board.

XSleeper How does "Mold resistant drywall" differ from Home Depot's "UltraLight Mold Tough" panels?

No tile will be outside the tub/shower.
 
  #19  
Old 07-01-20, 05:20 AM
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Mold resistant drywall is a generic term that covers all brands of drywall that are mold resistant... Lightweight or otherwise.

Just like tile backer board is a generic term that includes Kerdiboard, Durock, and any other type of tile backer.
 
  #20  
Old 07-01-20, 06:01 AM
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So the "mold tough" board is what I should be using, which is what I was planning on using, in the bathroom other than the shower area?
 
  #21  
Old 07-01-20, 06:38 AM
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Yep. The Green board you mentioned in your first post and "Mold Tough" are not the same.
 
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  #22  
Old 07-01-20, 09:43 AM
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Ok. That's the only way I know to call that board, Greenboard. That's how it was introduced to me. When I re-did my last bathroom, I only did demolition on it, I was told to get "Greenboard." I said, there's only this "Mold tough." He said, "That's greenboard."
 
  #23  
Old 07-01-20, 09:50 AM
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Green board is MOISTURE resistant. In a bathroom you simply don't use drywall in a wet location. You want MOLD resistant.

Moisture resistant drywall is not necessarily mold resistant unless it says it is both.
 
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